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I'm devising a story in which a group of hacker bees abbreviated hbeeze had their hacking attempts foiled by a bunch of cyber honeypots created by humans. The hbeeze being disappointed in this failure wanted to take revenge on the human race. Doing so they thought that they would build a real life honeypot made out of honey meant to trap humans.

How realistic is it for humans to see a pot of honey and decide to wander into because they generally like honey right? Then how also realistic would it be for the humans to get stuck to a wall through honey? How much and what amount of honey would be needed to get the affect?

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    $\begingroup$ This sounds like a comedy or children's story. In that case, whatever. Honey being super sticky is well established. World building is less about what can actually be and more about what makes sense. Honey being that sticky makes sense in those two genres $\endgroup$ – Raditz_35 Oct 4 at 0:33
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How realistic is it for humans to see a pot of honey and decide to wander into because they generally like honey right?

I like honey. I have friends who like honey. But no one I know would venture into a pot of honey because they like it. Reality check: not likely.

Then how also realistic would it be for the humans to get stuck to a wall through honey? How much and what amount of honey would be needed to get the affect?

This is the real question. And the answer is that honey isn't strong enough to stick a human to a wall. Honey's stickiness comes mostly from hydrogen interactions with its environment, forming hydrogen bonds and using van der Waals force, but that kind of force isn't good enough to keep a human from deciding to power through it. If you decided to encase a human in honey, that'd be a slightly different matter, as in would function in a similar manner to quicksand.

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  • $\begingroup$ "but that kind of force isn't good enough to keep a human from deciding to power through it" -> Could you please elaborate that part? I can't imagine that honey is strong enough, but why can't intermolecular forces be strong enough theoretically? Cars (heavy + fast) can't brake without them. And that's how people are kept together, isn't it? Without intermolecular forces, we would all just be a pile of bones and something like dust and some gas. If this was true, we wouldn't be able to stick to anything. I think this is just a claim I personally wouldn't trust without some kind of evidence $\endgroup$ – Raditz_35 Oct 4 at 0:17
  • $\begingroup$ Cars aren't a great example - sure friction stops cars, but it doesn't make them stick, and that's what we're looking for. And the forces involved in friction aren't just hydrogen bonds. As for body parts, hydrogen bonds are useful for protein folding, but more often than not they're directional rather than the main force behind everything sticking together - polar and nonpolar forces have a far greater impact than hydrogen bonds (which technically are polar forces, just awfully weak ones at that). Van der Waals is even worse. And, because of the weak forces, they scale poorly with size. $\endgroup$ – Halfthawed Oct 4 at 0:23
  • $\begingroup$ I'd say technically the rubber makes them stick but whatever, still my main point isnt adressed: Do you have any evidence that honey isn't strong enough or is this still just theorizing? You are correct that intramolecular bonds are not as powerful as intermolecular ones, but I wouldn't draw any conclusions from that. People can put out some force and you need to get into numbers or experiments here, qualitative arguments can then be used as an explanation for the result. Now to where you are completely false: hydrogen bonds are not just weak polar bonds, that's just not true $\endgroup$ – Raditz_35 Oct 4 at 0:28
  • $\begingroup$ Listen, mate, I think you're over thinking it. First of all, my friend is an apiarist (and they have told me on multiple occasions if they could they would live in a beehive so I think they would wander into the honeypot) and they have done some extensive research on the strength of honey. Maybe he is wrong, but he found that it is possible if there is enough honey to stick a medium sized dog to a wall, so a human couldn't be that far off, right? $\endgroup$ – DavieYellie Oct 4 at 0:41
  • $\begingroup$ @Raditz_35 en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen_bond Stronger than van der Waals, weaker than covalent and ionic bonds, and uses electronegative forces. That's a weak polar bond in my book, you might define it differently. $\endgroup$ – Halfthawed Oct 4 at 0:57
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Freeze, human.

Not the "police order", actual freezing.

Rig the honeypots with liquid nitrogen dispensers. Once the humans are caught, freeze the honey.

Honey never freezes, actually. It only gets thicker and thicker as its temperature lowers. So you can get the honey so cold the humans can't push the honey around anymore. They are stuck.

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I fear this is a problem outside of my ability to calculate. It is too hard for me. I did see this YouTube video though. Warning it has some semi-graphic imagery of a man consuming too much honey.

Honey Bath Challenge

I recommended muting the video when watching as it is just a distraction from the question at hand. It seems this man is able to move around and not get stuck in this honey. My only conclusion is that the hbeeze as you call them plan would be foiled. However this could be amended through possibly lowering the temperature or raising it. Further research is needed.

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How realistic is it for someone to enter a pot of honey? If you have the right character everything can happen. Just make it believable that your character is curious enough and does not usually think ahead. If your character previously acted cautious in all other encounters than the reader would throw the book aside and say "why the f would he go in there?!", but if the character can not resist anything unusual than it's fine.

How realistic is it someone got stuck on a wall of honey? On the middle of the wall? Not so much. Why would someone get stuck to a wall to begin with. If the characters enters the pot from the top, would they not jump down? No, on that part I would scratch my head and imagine the person, even if stuck on the wall to begin with, slowly gliding downwards.

Honey is runny, even the creamier kinds, and thereby it would gather on the floor. Also, there could be wax cakes on the floor, seemingly tough to begin with, then suddenly giving in. The character could get stuck to the knees, belly or even only with the head potruding. The arms could be free and try to dig their way out, but the honey is too runny and sluggish at the same time. Or the arms are stuck as well, only the hands free but useless, wiggling around. You could make it a slow sink or a sudden brake.

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