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Now that we know about the electric nature of the cosmos, the question arises: "How much are planets affected by electric forces while moving through the universe?" We have been taught that the movements of planets around the Sun are determined by the gravitational forces. Since 99.9% of the universe if plasma, shouldn't the electric force be the predominant force between astronomical bodies?

I have seen a ball in the air supported by a jet of water (https://gfycat.com/littlegleefulhoverfly). Could the same effect be produced with electricity? Since all planets have their magnetic fields, could entire planes be held floating in the space with strong space-currents?

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  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to world building. Please ask a single world building question which can be measurably answered. We don't deal with open ended discussions. You can find more in the help center and taking the tour. $\endgroup$ – L.Dutch - Reinstate Monica Sep 16 '19 at 11:16
  • $\begingroup$ Sorry for that. $\endgroup$ – Marino Klisovich Sep 16 '19 at 11:38
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Since 99.9% of the universe if plasma, shouldn't the electric force be the predominant force between astronomical bodies?

Nope, because plasmas are basically electrically neutral outside of their Debye length, which (roughly speaking) is the distance between the positive and negative charge carriers in the plasma. From the point of view of a planet or companion star, a star is basically electrically neutral and doesn't produce an interesting electrical field at a distance (though you'll see some interesting effects if you're actually in the stellar atmosphere).

Moreover, electrical and magnetic field strengths around dipoles follow an inverse cube relationship, not inverse square. This means their strength drops off more rapidly than gravity, which is of course inverse-square. The sun does obviously have a strong magnetic field, but it just isn't strong enough to dominate over gravitational effects unless (again) you're pretty much in the solar atmosphere.

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