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How would a society have progressed from having torture to having it disappear from society the change being due to some omnipotent being or some kind of international legislation?

The disappearance is such that even the concept is unknown to most people and only scholars know of the word and what it means.

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  • $\begingroup$ Because they read micro-expressions so making torture totally unnecessary and counter-productive. $\endgroup$ – user2617804 Apr 30 '15 at 13:04
  • $\begingroup$ This question is VERY broad. It really deserves a good old closing. $\endgroup$ – JDSweetBeat Apr 30 '15 at 13:55
  • $\begingroup$ And besides, modern Western culture has all but eliminated torture as a viable means of punishment. $\endgroup$ – JDSweetBeat Apr 30 '15 at 13:56
  • $\begingroup$ The concept makes me think of the control over language in 1984. $\endgroup$ – JDługosz Apr 30 '15 at 18:46
  • $\begingroup$ ... Merde... I forgot to add a "NOT" to the beginning of "being due to some omnipotent being or some kind of international legislation?" ... Gonna rename to indicate to omnipotent thing, then post a corrected question... with this title... Or should I just edit the question, even though that would invalidate answers? $\endgroup$ – Malady Apr 30 '15 at 19:24
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Building on @PavelJanicek's idea of actually feeling the pain...

An comparatively omnipotent being visits the society and as a side effect of their presence on the world, a temporary unity of spirits forms, linking the nervous systems of every sentient life form. Maybe the being was trying to help or maybe it is just a divine parlor trick which it caused for its own amusement. In any case, after a few generations, the being returns to the stars and the people of your society return to being individuals.

But they have been changed fundamentally. None of them can forget what it felt like to be starving, beaten or tortured. Compassion has become a social minimum, and those elements of their history which don't live up to that minimum are quickly forgotten; left to the scholars, soon to become mythology.

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Humanism: See the slave doing funny moves while being tortured? What if they actually feel the pain? What if all people are equal and what if people deserve rights?

I personally count humanism as "atheistic"

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  • $\begingroup$ I wouldn't consider humanism as atheistic or theistic; it's independent of religious matters. $\endgroup$ – Frostfyre Apr 30 '15 at 12:50
  • $\begingroup$ It's a little closer to say "atheistic" is "humanism", as humanism is bigger than just atheism but "atheistic" is often used to mean "humanist", at least in my experience. $\endgroup$ – Erik Apr 30 '15 at 12:51
  • $\begingroup$ Thats why I added "personally" because I am not quite sure about religious status of humanism $\endgroup$ – Pavel Janicek Apr 30 '15 at 12:53
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One common use of torture in society today is for sadistic psychopathic pleasure. If society were somehow to progress to the point where people with antisocial tendencies could reliably be identified and effectively treated, then that aspect of torture could very well fade away.

The other use of torture, to extract information, is widely claimed to be ineffective. I conjecture that many of those who claim torture is useful, despite all the evidence, may well be people with antisocial tendencies. Cure the psychopaths and you might also cure these lesser antisocial trends.

Once torture is no longer in use, it could eventually be forgotten by common people.

However, I think this last conjecture is the least realistic of my assumptions.

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