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I've seen almost the same question here, but it was like Can a microorganism reproduce so fast, to be used as fuel?. Then, I was inspired and new question came up. Does some real microorganism in some laboratory environment can be forced to reproduce so fast that it can be used as weapon?


Weapon logic: I have some grenade where that microorganism is hibernated. Then, when I activate it, some reaction happens and environment mentioned in question comes up. Microorganism starts to reproduce and in some seconds fills the room, as cement mortar or polyurethane foam, and people inside buried alive.


P.S: Real scenario might be fundamentally different, but I think the main idea is clear.

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  • $\begingroup$ To the downvoters, please don't forget to explain the reason for your downvote. It's important for the OP to get feedback. Thanks! :) $\endgroup$
    – Qami
    Aug 30 '19 at 13:40
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No. Reproduction of organisms doesn't produce matter out of nothing. There is conservation of mass. Moreover, most organisms are high % water, so even in best case scenario, to get full room of your microorganism, they'd have to get like 20% of volume of the room of water, not even talking about need for carbon.

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Weapon logic: I have some grenade where that microorganism is hibernated. Then, when I activate it, some reaction happens and environment mentioned in question comes up. Microorganism starts to reproduce and in some seconds (for example) fills the room and people inside buried alive.

This is the very fundamental logic of biological weapons:

Biological warfare (BW)—also known as germ warfare—is the use of biological toxins or infectious agents such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi with the intent to kill or incapacitate humans, animals or plants as an act of war. Biological weapons (often termed "bio-weapons", "biological threat agents", or "bio-agents") are living organisms or replicating entities (viruses, which are not universally considered "alive") that reproduce or replicate within their host victims.

Biological weapons may be employed in various ways to gain a strategic or tactical advantage over the enemy, either by threats or by actual deployments. Like some chemical weapons, biological weapons may also be useful as area denial weapons. These agents may be lethal or non-lethal, and may be targeted against a single individual, a group of people, or even an entire population. They may be developed, acquired, stockpiled or deployed by nation states or by non-national groups. In the latter case, or if a nation-state uses it clandestinely, it may also be considered bioterrorism.

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  • $\begingroup$ Hello! Thanks for your answer! Sorry, but I think there is some miscommunication. I will update question. $\endgroup$ Aug 30 '19 at 8:23
  • $\begingroup$ I'm not sure this fulfills the OP's requirement that people are buried alive. $\endgroup$
    – HDE 226868
    Aug 30 '19 at 13:26
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I don't know about the planet in question, but here on Earth, we have one thing called necrotizing fasciitis and it's a mean and fast bacterial problem to have. It's mostly beaten by amputation. Taking the water dilemma into consideration, what if your insidious bio-weapon didn't fill the room; it fills the people? Plenty of water and food and some precedent and leaves the environment ripe for another group to take over after the air is clear.

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Yes, absolutely. For example, anthrax and small pox have been weaponised or actually used as weapons in the past. They key is that a micro-organism doesn’t have to reproduce very fast to be an effective weapon, if the reproduction occurs inside a human body. It doesn’t need to be a timescale of seconds; a few days will be fine.

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