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For my question, I was wondering the idea of a creature that needed to be visually seen by Humans or else, if no sight on it by a human being has been made then it can only last for 24 Hours.

I was wondering, despite the obvious Non-Scientific biology part of it, would there be a more scientific and biology wise way for the creature to evolve so that it would allow it to be seen by humans at a common rate, or would evolution actually put it in a more domestic state to ensure survival?

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    $\begingroup$ If the creature needs to be seen in order to survive, it would've already evolved to the point where humans constantly see it ... Anyhow, just choose some random animal that might be seen very often - there are plenty. various pets, birds like pigeons, farm animals, several insects might be believable, What you call evolution has a lot of random elements. That means that there isn't a rule for what that animal would look like. There is no wrong answer here, relax and do whatever you want $\endgroup$ – Raditz_35 Aug 24 at 12:35
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    $\begingroup$ You mean like cats? $\endgroup$ – AlexP Aug 24 at 13:57
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    $\begingroup$ Is observation the only nutrition it requires? Or does it still need things like water, oxygen, maybe some food? Is it like an autotroph that uses observation like plants use light? $\endgroup$ – aadv Aug 24 at 14:20
  • $\begingroup$ I would say that nutrition and things like that yes and yes, only human observation appears to keep them alive for 24 hours for unknown reason. $\endgroup$ – AOS1981 Leader Of The 1981 Arm Aug 24 at 15:44
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    $\begingroup$ Exactly why it needs to be seen by humans is probably going to define the reason it would evolve. There are plenty of creatures that became domesticated but that doesn't seem to be your meaning. $\endgroup$ – StephenG Aug 24 at 19:53
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There is a creature that needs to be seen by humans multiple times per day in order to survive, but only during its first years of life.

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See what I mean? Lose sight of these creatures for five minutes and they take their own lives.

You have to feed and clean them too. Some would say they evolved to be cute so that we instinctively do that.

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    $\begingroup$ In addition to cuteness, they come with an audible alarm system that is practically impossible for adult humans to ignore and that fires when they need food etc. $\endgroup$ – Patricia Shanahan Aug 24 at 15:22
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    $\begingroup$ “Wriggly little suicide machines”... $\endgroup$ – Joe Bloggs Aug 24 at 19:02
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    $\begingroup$ "First few years" ? More like twenty or thirty in many cases. :-) $\endgroup$ – StephenG Aug 24 at 19:51
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    $\begingroup$ Ha ha ha! I have a picture of my daughter slightly older but otherwise just like that top picture, only she's a full story up on the outside of a balcony over concrete. She's made it to her teens so far... $\endgroup$ – Cyn says make Monica whole Aug 25 at 4:32
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    $\begingroup$ Cutest when trying to kill themselves :-) Not to mention the extra entertainment when a parent runs over in panic to prevent the suicide $\endgroup$ – Nahshon paz Aug 25 at 7:00
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Evolution works by environmental pressures, both positive and negative.

In your case, a creature starts off independent of humans. At some point, being seen by humans becomes beneficial. This is your positive environmental pressure. Those in the population who have the "seen by humans" genes have a higher survival rate than the others. The benefit increases and becomes overwhelming (only those seen by humans survive or breed). Not being seen by humans is a negative pressure. Now your creatures are dependent on being seen by humans, since the previous population that could exist without humans has become extinct.

However, what benefit they could get from being seen by humans escapes me. The benefit would need to be extreme for this to happen, otherwise the creatures would easily revert to non-observed by humans. The only example I can think of is a cliff-growing plant whose only natural pollinator is unknown and has become extinct. A team of scientists pollinate these plants every year to stop them from becoming extinct as well. Now any of these plants which are not seen by humans in their lifetime will be unable to reproduce and will die without offspring, but not in 24 hours.

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Some options:

  • Birds that prey on mosquitoes that only prey on humans. The birds need to eat every day and therefore they hunt these mosquitoes that are around humans all the time.

  • You could say that the need to be seen by humans didn't evolve as a survival benefit but a reproduction benefit in that the animals that allowed themselves to be seen by humans were perceived as more attractive by the opposite sex because they were fit enough to afford being seen by humans. Hence the animals within that species who were being seen by humans would have a mating advantage and gradually become the dominant type of animal within their species.

  • Maybe a symbiosis system where the animals use being seen by humans as an escape strategy or protection strategy against predators, in that they either escape from predators by running towards humans being seen by them who then might hunt the predator upon seeing it, or as a protection mechanism where they lived close so none of the predators dared approach them because of them living close to humans.

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It evolved to be cute, in fact the cuteness evolution is so great that it's now incapable of hunting for food (think evoking something impractical like peacocks feathers). Humans will instinictivly stop and stare at it and will likely drop things in their hands, like food. Once the human moves on the creature can then scavagne the dropped food. Thus it must be constantly seen by a human or else it will run out of food and die, and not every human will be holding food at the time so it must do this repeatedly.

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A (witch's?) familiar creates a bond with his master/mistress and they both benefit from this bond. Without a shared benefit humans will lose interest.

The babies in @Renan 's answer are a cute example of that - you get continuation out of looking at your kid from time to time... I personally don't like cats, but seeing the number of funny cat clips on youtube, understand that some people take pleasure in looking at those :-) Does being seen on youtube count?

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