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Supposedly, a relatively smart + educated young woman from modern society is transmigrated into a body of a woman living in a country that is similar to 17th-century Europe. Monarchy and nobility exist. The country practices cross-border trading with other countries —> free market economy. Religion takes part in politics. Human rights are underdeveloped, e.g slaves etc.

Edit: sexism is not a problem in this world, meaning women can participate in politics and such.

What kind of political/economic or medical policy can they suggest to improve the country (in modern standards), without hugely offending the higher-ups?

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  • $\begingroup$ Please use the Contact Us form to have your accounts merged. $\endgroup$ – Glorfindel Aug 20 '19 at 6:59
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    $\begingroup$ Hello and Welcome Vivi. This question feels overly broad to me as the impact your character can have on the past is entirely up to you. Very small things have huge effects, and as mentioned by Glorfindel, something as common as Washing hands could change everything. $\endgroup$ – Shadowzee Aug 20 '19 at 6:59
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    $\begingroup$ There actually was such a woman. Her name was Mary II of England. She ruled England together with her husband, king William III of England; they are one of the few royal couples retained in history as genuine co-rulers; the other well known example is Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain. During the reign of William and Mary, England introduced religious toleration, and, crucially, the Bill of Rights. $\endgroup$ – AlexP Aug 20 '19 at 8:22
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    $\begingroup$ "Sexism is not a problem in this world, meaning women can participate in politics and such": you do understand that this is not 17th century Europe? This is a change of such magnitude that there is no way that the rest of the society is even remotely similar to 17th century Europe. (And please remember that there was no such thing as "human rights" in 17th century Europe. Not that they were underdeveloped; the very concept did not exist at all.) $\endgroup$ – AlexP Aug 20 '19 at 8:27
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    $\begingroup$ a) She can suggest many things, just like a modern woman in modern times can suggest a lot of things - getting them implemented is a whole other story, usually involving pretty hard work over years or decades, usually failing; b) the higher-ups are going to be offended by nearly every change proposed, just because when you're at the very top, changes are far more likely to worsen your position than improving it even more. $\endgroup$ – Rekesoft Aug 20 '19 at 9:43
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Frame challenge: whatever policy you suggest, no matter how much evidence or argumentation you'll have for the policy, it won't make a difference.

Why? She won't be listened to. 17th century society was very paternalistic, the ruling men of that age wouldn't listen to a women's ideas about such matters.

A simple historical example of such a policy would be letting doctors wash their hands which drastically cut mortality rate in hospitals. You see that even a simple policy change by a well-respected professonial had a very hard time being adopted. That doesn't bode well for whatever your transmigrated person would suggest, whether it would be a man or a woman.

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