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Basically, the evacuated chamber is to perform some experiments. The spacecraft is of single stage to orbit variety. I am asking in terms of whether one can build it using generally used materials of construction like iron, etc.

Edit 1: The space for the vacuum chamber would be about 40 % of the space craft's volume, somewhat like an airship. the spacecraft should be able to evacuate the chamber on its own, even if it is on the surface of the earth, or any other planet with a dense atmosphere. It would probably be used to transfer stuff which would be air-sensitive, like alien bodies which were unaccustomed to oxygen gas.

Edit 2: The technological development of my species is the same as that of humans. An airlock big enough to contain many small space vehicles (in SF) (like an aircraft carrier carries planes) would be sufficient for my needs.

Edit 3: Vacuuum as in vacuum wikipedia 10−13 torr (13 pPa)

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    $\begingroup$ I'm not totally clear what you mean... obviously if you can get to orbit, you can just open a door and get all the vacuum you could want (more or less). Building vacuum chambers is straightfoward enough. Building an SSTO is pretty hard though, and you probably wouldn't be building much of it out of iron if you could use something lighter and more stable. $\endgroup$ – Starfish Prime Aug 18 at 13:19
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    $\begingroup$ In which case, doesn't your argument just devolve to "is it possible to make a vacuum chamber?" (the answer is "yes") or "is it possible to make an airlock with a vacuum pump" (to which the answer is also just "yes"). Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong! $\endgroup$ – Starfish Prime Aug 18 at 13:57
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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Worldbuilding.SE Tejas, glad you found us. Please check out our tour and help center. We're pretty picky about questions here so please don't worry about all the comments. Stick around, read, answer, and ask more questions if you wish. $\endgroup$ – Cyn says make Monica whole Aug 18 at 13:58
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    $\begingroup$ All matter is thermodynamically impossible, you would need an infinite amount of energy to get a perfect vacuum; this is one of those situations, where you just have to say good enough at some point $\endgroup$ – nzaman Aug 18 at 14:32
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    $\begingroup$ @TejasShetty Could you please edit your question to specify your size requirements? Is this the only difference from existing airlocks? Would an airlock big enough to contain a small space vehicle (in SF) be sufficient for your needs? Or are there other requirements? $\endgroup$ – Cyn says make Monica whole Aug 18 at 14:35
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the evacuated chamber is to perform some experiments. The spacecraft is of single stage to orbit variety. I am asking in terms of whether one can build it using generally used materials of construction like iron, etc.

A chamber with the intention to contain just vacuum when in operation and when it's surrounded by vacuum is quite trivial to construct.

You need a structure that unfolds when in orbit. It can be completely flat when stowed during launch. It can be stowed in a variety of folded forms.

As I assume you want a sealed region of vacuum, then you simply need a small aperture which can be closed after deployment. A door, basically. There are lots of ways to make a sealed door, and as pressure on both sides is the same there is no issue with having to resist a higher pressure on one side.

You would require an airlock of some wort to manage transfers between pressurized ship areas and the contained space, but that's pretty trivial.

If equipment needs to be deployed in the chamber you would store this during launch and deploy it from a dedicated cargo area, moving it to the contained space via the door.

Depending on precisely why you need it enclosed, the materials used could range from thin plastic to e.g. rigid hinged metal parts.

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