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Marine ships and boats have ports. Airplanes have airports. In scifi spaceships can have space ports. What would be the airship equivalent in a steampunk world where marine ships are still heavily used? So that avoiding the use of port would keep things non-ambiguous.

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closed as off-topic by We are Monica., Halfthawed, EDL, Vincent, rek Aug 13 at 2:31

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about worldbuilding, within the scope defined in the help center." – We are Monica., EDL, rek
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ Welcome, if you have a bit of time spare, then check out the tour and the help center. This may well be a part of your fictional world, but it might, in future be best to as for "single word requests" on English Language & Usage where they are on-topic. I suspect that you already have the best answers that you're going to get here, so voting to close as off topic - not about worldbuilding. $\endgroup$ – We are Monica. Aug 12 at 22:32
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    $\begingroup$ is there a reason an airship wouldn't dock at an airport? $\endgroup$ – LinkBerest Aug 13 at 0:28
  • $\begingroup$ @Chickensarenotcows Thanks for letting me know. I'm okay with it if a mod wants to migrate this question to English.SE. $\endgroup$ – Lux Claridge Aug 13 at 13:03
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I like aerodrome.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerodrome

In the early days of aviation, when there were no paved runways and all landing fields were grass, a typical airfield might permit takeoffs and landings in only a couple of directions, much like today's airports, whereas an aerodrome was distinguished, by virtue of its much greater size, by its ability to handle landings and take offs in any direction. The ability to always take off and land directly into the wind, regardless of the wind's direction, was an important advantage in the earliest days of aviation when an airplane's performance in a crosswind takeoff or landing might be poor or even dangerous. The development of differential braking in aircraft, improved aircraft performance, utilization of paved runways, and the fact that a circular aerodrome required much more space than did the "L" or triangle shaped airfield, eventually made the early aerodromes obsolete.

Airport implies a runway, as noted. A blimp does not need a runway and early airplanes might need a variety of takeoff directions according to wind. A large field suitable for hosting all manner of airships could be (and was!) called an aerodrome.

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It's called an Airship Docking Station.

The top of the Empire State Building was designed as the mooring mast for an airship docking station for Zepplins, but it was never used. (The real reason was to make it taller than the Chrysler Building.)

Fake photo.

Fake photo (The Empire State Building as Airship Docking Station - The New York Times).

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In his 1908 novel "The War in the Air" H. G. Wells refers to them as "aeronautic parks".

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  • $\begingroup$ I like this. I think I am going to use it in one particular case as it has a ritzy kind of ring to it. Thanks! $\endgroup$ – Lux Claridge Aug 13 at 13:12
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As it turns out there are many kinds of airships in real life. The most common are airplanes, then helicopters, and there are still a few dirigibles running around (for steampunk, I assume these are the airships you care about). They come to dock and stage from locations that are generally called... drum-roll please... AIRPORTS!!!

Heck the name going around for places for spacecraft to stage from is "spaceport". Maybe not all that exotic - use some of the other excellent answers in this thread for that. However, the actual, factual answer to the question is the mundane airport.

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  • $\begingroup$ Potential problems: 1. "airport" seems to have first been used (to refer to something other than a porthole that opens to the exterior air of a ship) in 1919, while "aerodrome" dates back to 1902. 2. an "airport" is a subset of "aerodrome", making it a more specific term where, perhaps, a more general term is wanted. $\endgroup$ – elemtilas Aug 13 at 13:53

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