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This question is heavily inspired by Netflix series Another Life

We build another worlds to be explored. Mostly by humans. However, reckless behavior of space crew of ship Salvare made me realize, how hard landing on other planet can actually be.

Setup: May there be another planet in habitable zone of its star. It has fauna and flora and even atmosphere very similar to Earth. However, the similarity ends there.

You get a branch under your skin? It will poison you. What we know as Ebola is "common flu" on that planet and every other virus there is even deadlier to the humans. Not even speaking about bacteria.

And even if we do not go to that extreme, one is clear: Most things on realistically alien planet will try to kill you, because that's what evolution is essentially about.

(How) can we realistically land on an alien planet and survive there, knowing that every single living thing there will evolutionarily consider you as a threat and treat you accordingly?

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closed as too broad by Ash, Morris The Cat, Dubukay, user535733, Starfish Prime Aug 7 at 19:42

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Possible duplicate of What would be the human physiological reaction to an alien biosphere? $\endgroup$ – Ash Aug 7 at 17:13
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    $\begingroup$ I feel like this is off-topic, or at least too broad under the rules. Alien planets may be as hazardous as you're assuming, they may not. A more appropriate question might be : given a specific set of hazards, how would humans overcome them? Your question keeps the hazards open-ended, which basically makes an reasonable answer impossible. Voting to close pending edits to tighten up the question. $\endgroup$ – Morris The Cat Aug 7 at 17:16
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    $\begingroup$ Since we don't really have a lot of life-filled planets to study, why are you assuming that other planets would be more hostile to human life than Earth is? I'm sure alien planets are just as likely to be filled with completely incompatible diseases as they are to be filled with zoonotic ones. $\endgroup$ – Giter Aug 7 at 17:26
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    $\begingroup$ '(How) can we realistically land on an alien planet and survive there, knowing that every single living thing there will evolutionarily consider you as a threat and treat you accordingly?' - This is wrong. Evolutionarily, they won't consider you a threat because you didn't evolve on their planet, unless there's a similar species to humans. $\endgroup$ – Halfthawed Aug 7 at 17:40
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    $\begingroup$ Why would life on another planet "evolutionarily consider" me anything? It has had no contact with Earth life, and so no chance to evolve any relationship. Also, why would alien life be more hostile than, say, the life on Earth? The number of things on Earth that can poison me, crush me, bite me, eat me, drink my blood, brood eggs in me, etc., is huge. $\endgroup$ – puppetsock Aug 7 at 17:41
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People can survive in hostile environments. In Australia, plenty of things can kill or poison you, including koalas and some plants. In Africa, plenty of western explorers died from yellow fever, but they pushed on. With proper discipline and scientific methods, it is a simple matter of identifying the hazards, finding ways to protect against them, and then deciding if costs justify the benefits.

Moreover, alien does not automatically mean poisonous. Human body has ways to protect itself again many substances. A proper ecosystem has large variety so some things in it will be safe for humans.

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    $\begingroup$ +1 for Australia as a comparison model for alien environments where everything wants to kill you. $\endgroup$ – Renan Aug 7 at 17:38
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    $\begingroup$ The problem with this answer is that the value of a human life is much more expendable on Earth where there are a lot of replacements hanging around (all of them, actually) however, on an alien planet you have fewer people to take over if you die exploring. $\endgroup$ – Muuski Aug 7 at 17:44
  • $\begingroup$ I should give a -1 for mentioning Australia even though it is a good point of comparison in this case but actually you're getting it for "A proper ecosystem has large variety so some things in it will be safe for humans." just no, if the entire ecosystem has evolved from something similar to a diatom rather than our soft bodied bacterial ancestors then the micro silica in all it's organisms will kill everyone and that's a super mild example of an ecosystem that will be universally lethal. $\endgroup$ – Ash Aug 7 at 17:46
  • $\begingroup$ @Muuski Early colonization (including that of Australia) has same problem of many dangers to colonists. But they still came, either to gain the promised riches, or b/c their life in home country was even worse $\endgroup$ – Bald Bear Aug 7 at 19:30
  • $\begingroup$ @baldbear Early Australians didn't return home because they were convicts and would have been hanged if they did. $\endgroup$ – DrMcCleod Aug 7 at 20:07

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