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In this world, a progenitor has created a mass of order out of chaos, with the possibility of entropic fluctuations increasing the further out from the center you get. What do I mean by entropic fluctuations? I mean that earthquakes, shifting gravity, and brief dissolution become more and more likely the further out you get. Livestock on the edges need wings to avoid being tossed up and splatted by shifting gravity or falling off a cliff/engulfed when earthquakes occur. While raw vacuum is never introduced for more than a split second, air pressure might fluctuate due to the violation of earth and sea. Imagine massive amounts of energy pulling things apart and the resulting whoosh of air filling that space.

But that brings me to my question. Part of the reason that oceans were where life began on Earth is because of the ocean's relative inviolability: once you get a couple hundred feet down, the temperature, pH, and medium (water) don't change much. What kinds of adaptations would sea creatures need to survive earthquakes, gravity shifts, and brief but sudden introductions of void (possibly cavitation)?

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    $\begingroup$ Not to start a discussion here, but:take bottle of soda, shake, open lid: cascade of bubbles is what I'd imagined occurring here with sudden pressure drop, dissolved Nitrogen, Oxygen etc.. Is that what you visualize? Cavitation shock is a way to go though. $\endgroup$ – Tantalus' touch. Aug 2 '19 at 20:01
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    $\begingroup$ Cavitation would make a lot of sense. What can survive a mantis shrimp attack? $\endgroup$ – Carduus Aug 2 '19 at 20:07
  • $\begingroup$ does "shifting gravity" mean shifting mass within the planet? Or physics-breaking (and stronger) changes in strength and direction of gravity? First scenario is survivable underwater, second one is not (it might even destroy the ocean) $\endgroup$ – Bald Bear Aug 2 '19 at 20:19
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    $\begingroup$ Most of this won't even bother aquatic life. $\endgroup$ – John Aug 2 '19 at 20:20
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    $\begingroup$ Frequency and density of occurrences matter, If these happen often enough you will be lucky to have liquid water. $\endgroup$ – John Aug 2 '19 at 20:28
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If unpredictable risk of death is high then R strategists are favored.

R strategists have lots and lots of offspring but don't invest much time or energy into each individual offspring. R strategist reproduce quickly and tend not to have long lifespans.

You will not see things like whales or sea turtles, creatures that take a long time to grow up and reproduce. You can still have big old creatures but they will be like lobsters, things that never stop growing and can reproduce fairly quickly.

Without more detailed information this is about all the information I can give.

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Creatures would evolve a variety of mechanisms:

  • Some would be able to sense impending disasters and escape ahead of time
  • Some would be able to dodge or move faster than disasters
  • Some would be able to endure disasters with armor or resistances
  • Some (and this is my favorite) would be to regenerate many individuals from their broken apart and damaged pieces and use it as part of their reproductive cycle
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