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Let's say that there is someone with the ability to reduce the speed of particles' movement (or vibration), he can reduce the movement of molecules, atoms and electrons. I want to know what will this allow him to do. For example: since he can reduce the movement of molecules he can now freeze or condense any substance. But what else? What can he do more by reducing the movement of atoms and electrons? Can he like stop electricity?

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closed as too broad by Ash, StephenG, Nahshon paz, dot_Sp0T, Cyn says make Monica whole Jul 14 at 15:21

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to Worldbuilding Moody Deeds. The question is too broad on so many levels... Somewhere between physics, metaphysics and psychology, philosophy. Wiser people than I can probably come up with a few other fields $\endgroup$ – Nahshon paz Jul 14 at 14:57
  • $\begingroup$ Welcome. Please check out our tour and help center. While this may make an interesting story, as a question, it's much too broad and "high concept" for this particular site. But stick around and answer and read and ask more questions if you like. $\endgroup$ – Cyn says make Monica whole Jul 14 at 15:01
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He can be omnipresent.

Due to Heisenberg's uncertainty, the more accurate our measurement of the speed a particle is, the less accurate our reading is of its position. By zeroing a particle's speed, its wave function will cause it to be everywhere at the same time.

It's hard to visualize the proper effect of this. It's the kind of thing that wrecks universes. In the very least it should not feel... Comfortable.

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  • $\begingroup$ It's relatively easy to prevent this issue by just saying he can only slow things down up to some precision. Nothing we do is ever exact, and in practice, the precision required to cause large-scale quantum effects is far, far beyond anything humans are physiologically capable of. $\endgroup$ – Gilad M Jul 14 at 14:53

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