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I'm making a human female who's size was multiplied by 10. I need to know what sort of accommodations she'd need to make up for any disadvantages. This is in the modern day, so 21st-century medicine and technology would be available to her.

Her new size is 15.14 m (49' 7 29/32") tall, and she was enlarged by a magical telescope, so square cubed law and thermodynamics are being ignored downplayed. Her vision wouldn't become blurry, due to the vision-based way the telescope works, but what other accommodations would she need? Edit: to clarify, I'm looking for medical accommodations, such as glasses, hearing aids, braces, and so on.

edit: Perhaps "ignored" is too strong of a word, she would feel heavier and stuff, but nothing to the extreme that keeping her alive would be more difficult and costly than disposing of a 91,000 lb cadaver.

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  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to Worldbuilding.SE! We're glad you could join us! When you have a moment, please click here to learn more about our culture and take our tour. Your question is a bit broad. "Accommodations" can mean anything and this site requires specific questions (and it's OK to post additional questions). Are you looking for medical? housing? transportation? changes to infrastructure (like electrical distribution towers/poles)? printing? (her vision is OK, but I doubt she could read a normal newspaper). (*continued*) $\endgroup$ – JBH May 4 at 17:20
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    $\begingroup$ Sorry, my bad. I'm specifically looking for medical accommodations, such as glasses, hearing aids, braces, etc. $\endgroup$ – Ashton Giertz May 4 at 17:55
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    $\begingroup$ The problem with compressive strength is that the compressive force changes quickly. For example, jumping and landing "badly" on your heels can generate multitudes of your bodyweight in force on your bones. Even if the giant can stand still, walking and even crawling has to be done slowly and carefully to prevent the bones breaking anyway. Use magic or a sciency bone replacement/reinforcement to avoid this. $\endgroup$ – Demigan May 4 at 17:56
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    $\begingroup$ @AshtonGiertz You seem to be speculativley changing the rules as you go along with every comment. As such you need to have asked a clear question in the fist place, and not use the forum here as a place where you engage in polemic oneupmanship. Voting to close as too broad. $\endgroup$ – Chickens are not cows May 4 at 19:34
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    $\begingroup$ @JBH You’re right, fault on my part. I should have kept that part of the help center in mind. $\endgroup$ – Liam Morris May 4 at 23:36
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Structural Support

Her entire body would need structural support, she would be far too big to for her muscles to support her own weight, this is known as the square-cube law. If you double something’s height, its surface area increases by four and its volume increases by eight.

If we take a 6ft human who weighs 180 lbs and can lift 180 lbs, his muscles are actually carrying 360 lbs as they are carrying the weight of his body plus the weight he is carrying.

The strength of muscles is dependant on their surface area.

If we double his height to 12 ft (6*2=12) his surface area increases to 1440 (360*4=1440) and his volume increases to 1440 lbs. What this means is all of his muscles are now supporting his own weight, any additional weight would be “the straw that broke the camel’s back”.

Your 50 to 60ft human* would not be able to support their own weight by any stretch of the imagination. They would be crushed under their own weight.

*Note that i am assuming you meant their size increases by 10 not by a factor of 10. If it were a factor of 10, thats 5^10 to 6^10 which is 9,765,625 ft to 60,466,176 ft. These numbers seem ridiculously large so this is why i assume you mean they increased by 10.

If you want to know more about giants, here is a question exploring the plausibility of giant humans and its subsequent duplicate:

What would be the tallest possible height for humanlike creatures in earthlike conditions?

Anatomically correct Giants

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    $\begingroup$ @AshtonGiertz Thats not how it works. The surface area she covers has nothing to do with the surface area of her muscles. Thats like saying if someone was flattened with a rolling pin, they’d have superman levels of strength. Also, her distributing her weight across the ground will not stop her internal organs from collapsing in on themselves from their own weight. $\endgroup$ – Liam Morris May 4 at 18:44
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    $\begingroup$ @AshtonGiertz I think you are vastly underestimating the square-cube law. If we were to multiply her height by 10, her surface area increases by 100 and her volume increases by 1000. I don’t need to calculate if the internal organs would be crushed if they were 1000 times heavier than they are, i know they would. You can’t just scale up biological organisms and expect everything to function normally. Also, you are wrong, the instant she is 1000 times heavier, she is dead. continued $\endgroup$ – Liam Morris May 4 at 19:05
  • $\begingroup$ You might as well drop 1000 of her clones onto of her and expect her to survive as that is essentially what you're doing. It doesnt matter if you add them one at a time or all at once, eventually she would be crushed to death by all that weight. $\endgroup$ – Liam Morris May 4 at 19:07
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    $\begingroup$ @AshtonGiertz Whilst something like an elephant has a heart substantially bigger and heavier than a humans, it evolved the structural support and strength necessary to allow it to function, a human heart has not. A human heart would be too heavy, the muscles would not be strong enough to pump the heart and allow blood to fill the chambers. Also, don’t forget this giant is 50 ft vertically, the heart would have to be immensely powerful to pump blood up such a long distance to the brain. Human organs as is would not be able to support 1000 times their own weight and still function. $\endgroup$ – Liam Morris May 4 at 19:21
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    $\begingroup$ @AshtonGiertz You seem to be speculativley changing the rules as you go along with every comment. As such you need to have asked a clear question in the fist place, and not use the forum here as a place where you engage in polemic oneupmanship. Voting to close as too broad. $\endgroup$ – Chickens are not cows May 4 at 19:34

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