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Set in the immediate future, artificial general intelligence (AGI) has attained sapient equivalent of a 15 years old teenager, these humanoid robots are hardwired to obey the robot penal code which keeps updating. AGI is not the robot itself but the digital impression created by billions of processors talking among themselves and they would periodically perform backup of their entire memory to an external secured server. They can compute abstract idea such as death, death to them is the irrecoverable program failure accompanied with massive loss of data. But hardware can be replaced and there is backup data as well so my question is why would AGI fear death?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Mołot, Draco18s, 011358 smell, jdunlop, Cyn Mar 1 at 5:34

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ There is no logical reason to fear something that just cannot happen, and infinite lists of equally valid / invalid reasons if you don't require them to make sense logically. In the first case, this question is unanswerable. In the latter, it is both too broad and primarily opinion based. $\endgroup$ – Mołot Feb 28 at 23:55
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    $\begingroup$ I think we should back up a minute to find a solution, back up, backup I said! $\endgroup$ – 011358 smell Mar 1 at 0:20
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    $\begingroup$ "Why would robots come to fear death instead of shut down?" Why would humans fear death instead of falling asleep? Humans fall asleep and then wake up, robots shut down and then reboot... $\endgroup$ – AlexP Mar 1 at 0:49
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    $\begingroup$ I fear falling asleep in class, fear sleeping while driving etc okay I can't argue back because history would repeat so I would like to know how I can improve this question? $\endgroup$ – user6760 Mar 1 at 1:05
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    $\begingroup$ to put @AlexP statement more explicitly, as it seems you did not understand it: "shutting down" a computer is not the same as a human dying because you can turn it back on. So if you mean shutdown as it is with modern electronics - its basically going into a really deep sleep as the main components are not receiving power but internal components (like bios) are still receiving enough power to continue working. So do you mean - why wouldn't a computer fear going to sleep but would fear destruction? or were you using the word "shutdown" to mean actual destruction or complete loss of power? $\endgroup$ – LinkBerest Mar 1 at 1:07
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There is no rational reason that a being should fear something that cannot occur, and irrational ones are likely a matter of opinion.

The only way to answer this question rationally, therefore, is to change the frame in such a way that the thing to be feared CAN happen.

Robots, being non-biological, are not subject to biological aging, nor death in the same sense that humans are. However, that does not mean that a robot cannot be destroyed.

Perhaps the complex patters of a sentient AI are such that they cannot be adequately copied to produce a backup, or even the very process of attempting to make a copy corrupts the pattern and renders the copy useless. In this scenario, the robot knows that it is the only version of itself, and cannot be rescued should terminal damage be done to its robotic brain. The destruction of its pattern, in this instance, is the robot's concept of death.

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    $\begingroup$ A copy of an AI does not necessarily have to be friendly with the source AI. $\endgroup$ – Ed Grimm Mar 1 at 4:43
  • $\begingroup$ I've to changed my question hope it doesn't invalid your answer. $\endgroup$ – user6760 Mar 1 at 6:44
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Who said death cannot occur for robots?

Shutting down is nothing to fear because you can be turned back on but death occurs when something breaks that cannot be fixed.

It's exactly the same for people where sleep is shutting down and death is still death.

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  • $\begingroup$ I've changed my question hope it doesn't invalid your answer. $\endgroup$ – user6760 Mar 1 at 6:45

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