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I'm looking at making an alien race with two heads. The idea is that it has two brains as well, which instead of having two consciousnesses the brains are linked together as one.

Is this possible? Are there any real world examples? Is there more downsides than its worth?

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closed as off-topic by sphennings, rek, Cyn, Shadowzee, JBH Feb 27 at 6:09

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  • "This question does not appear to be about worldbuilding, within the scope defined in the help center." – rek, Shadowzee
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Possible duplicate of Application of magically-created chimeras $\endgroup$ – Renan Feb 22 at 13:27
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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Worldbuilding.SE. Unfortunately, this is a very broad and unfocused question. I don't think it's a duplicate of the linked question but it needs a bit more work IMHO before it's ready for prime time. Real world examples are conjoined twins. They are rare and only a few share a body but have two heads/brains. They do not share consciousness (no more than other identical twins anyway) but you can build your aliens however you want. $\endgroup$ – Cyn Feb 22 at 15:20
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    $\begingroup$ @Patrick777777 - I don't understand. There are two brains but they are linked together as one. What does that actually mean - how are they linked? Physically - by what? If so then humans already have this. Our brains have two hemispheres joined by the corpus callosum. It is possible to separate the hemispheres surgically, and effectively give one person two consciousnesses. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dual_consciousness $\endgroup$ – chasly from UK Feb 22 at 20:07
  • $\begingroup$ we have that right now, our brains are actually segments that work together, at least three semi independent ones reside in your head $\endgroup$ – Kilisi Feb 23 at 10:51
  • $\begingroup$ Hello Patrick. I cast the final close vote, and I wanted you to know why. Stack Exchange is focused on asking specific, objective, well-focused questions and receiving concise, detailed answers. This question (actually three questions) is not well defined, which is reflected in the many disparate close votes (NAW, TB, UNC). If you think about it, the answer you selected doesn't actually answer your question, suggesting you didn't really know what you were looking for, either. We hope you stick with us. But you might want to review our help center and help center pages. $\endgroup$ – JBH Feb 27 at 6:15
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You have multiple cases of two-headed malformed bodies that happened in the real world (from lizard to sheep). There are even conjoined human twins living in USA sharing a single body with two heads. I'd advise you to simply ask Google for examples.

Edit (thanks to Pelinore): Every instance of this on record is down to developmental problems in the womb, most often identical twins that only partially separated or parasitic twins that weren't fully absorbed by the "surviving" twin. None have been due to gene mutations.


If you are looking for a creature with a brain that is spread across the body with several main parts, octopuses hold a part of their brain in each of their tentacles, if memory serves.

Your question is a bit unclear about the "consciousness" part, since it's a human trait.


Edit to clarify: The first paragraph is about a body with two heads and two brains, which produce two separates "beings" sharing the same body.

The second is about a single being but with multiples brains (9 in this case).

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  • $\begingroup$ I'd also say that you would have found fairly easily with a real quick research on the matter. $\endgroup$ – Nyakouai Feb 22 at 13:03
  • $\begingroup$ You might look into the human bicameral brain and how this theory suggests the human brain can act as two separate brains that are linked as one. See: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bicameralism_(psychology) $\endgroup$ – Ray Butterworth Feb 22 at 14:21
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    $\begingroup$ I'd down-vote this for use of the word "mutant" if I was bothered enough to sacrifice the point. : Every instance of this on record is down to developmental problems in the womb, most often identical twins that only partially separated or parasitic twins that weren't fully absorbed by the "surviving" twin. : None have been due to gene mutations. $\endgroup$ – Pelinore Feb 22 at 17:02
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    $\begingroup$ @Pelinore good to know, I wasn't aware it was the case everytime. Will edit accordingly. $\endgroup$ – Nyakouai Feb 22 at 17:04

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