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The girl is 14 and wants to participate in a video game tournament, specifically The International DotA 2 tournament. She has found place with a team and it's 2 months before TI. Assuming they qualify, how will she get time off UK school? The entire thing will take 2-3 months and she needs to get back into school after it.

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closed as off-topic by Elmy, Alex2006, Mołot, StephenG, Renan Feb 7 at 10:24

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    $\begingroup$ This question doesn't appear to be about world building, if anything the OP appears to be seeking information on the real world legal & administrative situation in the UK? $\endgroup$ – Pelinore Feb 7 at 9:35
  • $\begingroup$ Look at how young people attend the olympics despite still having obligations at school. $\endgroup$ – Shadowzee Feb 8 at 5:17
  • $\begingroup$ My question was answered thanks to @Separatrix $\endgroup$ – Neo Darwin Feb 8 at 5:37
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There are two windows within which it's possible and she's not in either of them. GCSE year (age 16) and A' level year (age 18) (or whatever they're called now). The final exams run earlier than the normal school exams, giving an extended summer break that can run up to 3 months depending on courses taken.

Otherwise she'd probably have to leave the school and be officially homeschooled for the duration. This is legal but must be declared.

This is also a consideration in more conventional professional sports. The issue being that you have a very narrow window in which you can train to be the very best at a physical activity and then possibly a relatively short professional career. Exams and education can be returned to later, but the sport cannot as you'll be too old to become the best. As such taking a break from the conventional path through education to take the path of a professional sport is not unreasonable.

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