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I'm my novel there is a Queen who is marrying another woman.

Titles in my story are based on the English monarchy but this has never happened before.

What title would the queens wife be given? And if they adopted would their child still be in line to the throne or even a prince or princess. The society is quite developed so their sexuality is not an issue.

Are there real world examples to provide guidance.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by dot_Sp0T, Mołot, sphennings, Cyn, cobaltduck Dec 28 '18 at 15:26

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ allowing one woman to marry another is so far out of the cultural space of the "English monarchy" that no "realistic" names or titles help restore suspension of disbelief. If a real British queen was a lebsian, she would just keep her true love as one of her maids or court ladies. If she needs a child to inherit the throne, she will have to marry a man. $\endgroup$ – Bald Bear Dec 26 '18 at 21:03
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    $\begingroup$ When there is a ruling king, then his wife's title isn't "Queen", it's "Queen Consort". Only a ruling queen is a "Queen". So calling the queen's wife "Queen Consort" would still be one option. Another option would be "Princess", considering that the husband of the current Queen of England is referred to a "Prince". $\endgroup$ – Philipp Dec 26 '18 at 21:09
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    $\begingroup$ From the homosexual wedding of Lord Ivar Mountbatten in 2018, the English protocol is to consider it like an heterosexual marriage. So the wife of the Queen would be Queen consort. $\endgroup$ – Alberto Yagos Dec 26 '18 at 21:11
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    $\begingroup$ ... Another possibility is "Queen Consort". Victoria wanted to grant her husband the title "King Consort", but Parliament (rightly) refused because he was just a foreigner. ;) Generally speaking queen consorts will have no right to rule once the queen regnant dies or abdicates, as it is more a title of courtesy. $\endgroup$ – elemtilas Dec 26 '18 at 23:32
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    $\begingroup$ Voted to reopen - based on the comments there’s clearly a number of non-POB answers that can be grounded in real world precedent and how actual monarchies deal with same sex marriage amongst aristocrats $\endgroup$ – Pingcode Dec 27 '18 at 1:15
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From the comments (which probably occurred while it was on hold) it's quite obvious the answer you are looking for is "Queen Consort". The non-ruling spouse of the ruler. While it normally has been the spouse of a King there's nothing about it that precludes it being the spouse of a Queen.

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    $\begingroup$ I have gotten a good amount of comments saying that this would never happen and is unrealistic. I believe that I stated in the original question that there is no homophobia in this form of royalty. It is a fantasy world and with that in mind I am free to decide whether or not my royalty is seated in bigotry or not. This would not be a "royal scandal" she is the Queen of a large progressive empire. $\endgroup$ – thelonelywriter Dec 27 '18 at 12:27
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    $\begingroup$ I was going to say the same. Now I don't have to. @thelonelywriter I can't speak for everyone and there is a wide range of errr opinions on WB, but what I saw was that the issue of same sex marriage hasn't yet come up in British royalty so you couldn't base in on that. I still say the question is off-topic for WB but it's a reasonable question in and of itself. $\endgroup$ – Cyn Dec 27 '18 at 15:59
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    $\begingroup$ @thelonelywriter From your own question, you're only looking for "based on the English monarchy" not "completely identical to the English monarchy". The fact that the precise situation has not happened shouldn't be relevant. $\endgroup$ – T.J.L. Dec 27 '18 at 21:23
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You've got a choice of either "Queen Consort" or "Princess Consort" depending on whether there was an intent to avoid confusion.

Albert and Philip were given the title "Prince Consort". Camilla is expected to be Princess Consort rather than Queen Consort for reasons largely relating to Diana's position in the national consciousness, so while Princess Consort has no historical precedent in the UK this does make it an available option.

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  • $\begingroup$ The "Prince Consort" title was given to both due to the assumption (rooted in sexism, but there you are), that if someone is "king" they are assumed to be the one in charge while the same is not true for "queen" who, after all, could merely be the spouse of the king and not ruler in her own right. Using the title a step down the totem pole ensures there is no such confusion as to who is really running the place. $\endgroup$ – Keith Morrison Dec 27 '18 at 16:00
  • $\begingroup$ @KeithMorrison and precisely the same problem applies, so princess consort is the most likely title $\endgroup$ – Separatrix Dec 27 '18 at 16:49
  • $\begingroup$ I think whether she would be called queen consort or princess consort depends on what role she has at court. If she is just arm-candy who looks good next to the queen during formal events, she would likely be called "princess". But if she takes a more active role in the government with some non-trivial responsibilities, she might insist on "queen consort" to establish her authority. $\endgroup$ – Philipp Dec 27 '18 at 19:04
  • $\begingroup$ @Philipp, under the English system as requested by the OP, the consort's role is entirely ceremonial (and usually reproductive, but we're skipping that aspect here). $\endgroup$ – Separatrix Dec 27 '18 at 19:15

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