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What about pieces of hair, phlegm, mucus, sweat, I want the teleporter to limit his powers only to his body. Even something as ridiculous like tears and faeces. I will even extend it to the food and liquids consumed, but only if it doesn't work. (like teleporting shallowed small pieces of metal like coins into the target)

Will the target dying be likely? I had in the passing read of people surviving internal bleeding in the brain and surviving headshots. Rare cases? I don't know anything. Please help.

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closed as off-topic by Mołot, Renan, Vincent, Frostfyre, adaliabooks Dec 10 '18 at 17:10

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about worldbuilding, within the scope defined in the help center." – Renan, Vincent, Frostfyre, adaliabooks
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ If your method of teleporting allows putting things in brains of others, he can. If it doesn't, he cannot. it is for toy to decide. Also, this looks more like a story than a world. $\endgroup$ – Mołot Dec 10 '18 at 15:48
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    $\begingroup$ Related: worldbuilding.stackexchange.com/q/131359/21222 $\endgroup$ – Renan Dec 10 '18 at 15:52
  • $\begingroup$ I know that saliva contains bacteria for consuming leftovers of food in the mouth. They might just eat the other brain, if there are no white blood cells $\endgroup$ – user55267 Dec 10 '18 at 15:52
  • $\begingroup$ The question is, can this teleporter replace mass? Will the new material replace the old one? (aka a coin gets in someones brain and a Brain piece comes to the teleporter hand?) What about a rule that you need an empty space to be able to teleport? $\endgroup$ – Daniel Dec 10 '18 at 15:54
  • $\begingroup$ @Jannis by the time it takes them to do any damage, target is dead from increased pressure anyway. $\endgroup$ – Mołot Dec 10 '18 at 15:54
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Saliva inside the brain will almost certainly lead to death.

The mouth is one of the dirties parts of the body. We have tremendously powerful systems at play which try to keep the bacteria in check, like a saliva powered slip and slide that leads to a pool of sulfuric acid to take care of anything we don't like. It's the price we pay for wanting to be able to eat things.

The brain, on the other hand, is immunoprivileged. The blood-brain barrier is a tight packing of cells whose primary job is to keep out anything nasty. It also has the side effect of hindering the immune system from getting to the location. This is one of the reasons why brain eating amoebas are so very nasty. Our immune system simply has trouble getting there. It does have ways, and that is a field of current interest for biologists, but there are limits.

Combine this with the well known fact that bites are nasty and tend to lead to dangerous infections faster than we'd like, and its highly likely the bacteria in the brain would be able to do some real damage. Cat bites, in particular, are known for their ability to get infected because they can get saliva past where our mechanical methods of cleaning can get and past where the body's natural methods can deal with. The result of a cat bite is more often than not an abscess which never fully heals. It is left as an exercise for the reader to imagine how bad an abscess in the brain might be.

Of course, there are other options. Consider that the bite of the Komodo Dragon was long considered to be a highly poisonous concoction which resulted in a slow and agonizing death. It's saliva was considered to be just that dangerous. Later study showed that the methodology of the analysis was flawed. The real issue was that the bites were on the leg of the prey animal, such as a cow or a buffalo. That animal typically went back to its home turf, which had standing water. I'll leave it to you to draw your own conclusions as to what might be in the standing water in the home turf of a ruminant like a cow, and how that might apply to particularly deadly choices of material to teleport.

Of course, there is the question of aim. If your teleporter has surgical aim, there are many places where something small could do grave damage.

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Everything you teleport is going to be lethal in the right place.

Air into the bloodstream: embolism. Repeat till target dies.

Your own blood: unless they have the same bloodtype or a bloodtype that they can handle this will cause problems, not immediately lethal but repeat it enough in the brain and clots will occur causing embolisms again.

Skincells? In the bloodstream its dangerous, but directly between the brains can disrupt the careful chemical mix that keeps it working. Skincells with the local bacteria that live off of them and an infection occurs. Use gut bacteria, faeces and other stuff to cause brain infections that will get lethal in high enough doses. Basically everything is lethal in large enough quantities.

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The most available material that is deadly when teleported into a body is air.

If your aim is precide enough, you can teleport a tiny bubble into the artery pumping blood into the brain. If your aim is not precise enough, teleport a bigger bubble directly into the brain or the heart.

The air will either block smaller blood vessels directly or initiate blood clotting inside the body, resulting in thrombosis and stroke. Since the brain consumes a lot of oxygen and is extremely vulnerable to a lack therof, you'll see first results within a minute or even less. The consequences range from nausea to paralysis and death, depending on which blood vessel you manage to block.

If air (or gas in general) doesn't fit your rule of the teleporter only being able to teleport parts of his body, use feces or the content of his stomach instead to cause instant strokes in the victim with the added guarantee of blood poisoning.


If you want to constrict the rules even further and only use material that is actually produced by the body of the teleporter, use his own blood. If the victim is an incompatible blood donor to the teleporter, the teleported blood will initiate clotting inside their body, again causing thromboses. That adds the element of thrill if the victim actually has a compatible blood type and the teleporter has to sacrifice some other part of his body to kill his opponent.

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