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I am writing a fiction story. In that story, a man paralyzes his elder brother by lacing one of his food items, for example, milk or any other thing which he eats with a "thing" or a group of the "things". His brother does not feel anything. He straightaway suffers from paralysis(permanent). That is, he does not suffer from nausea; vomiting, "head revolving", dizziness etc. or does not feel anything else; straightaway suffers from paralysis(permanent). Can you tell me which are the things or the group of the things that the character of my story can use to paralyze his elder brother like that, i. e., straightaway suffering from permanent paralysis without feeling any other symptom like vomiting, "head revolving" etc.? And if that thing would not be detected in a hospital(as the nature of my story is), I would be more obliged.

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closed as off-topic by Mołot, chasly from UK, Lio Elbammalf, Vincent, JBH Dec 5 '18 at 19:48

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  • $\begingroup$ Questions about a story set in a world instead of about building a world are off-topic here. $\endgroup$ – Mołot Dec 5 '18 at 18:18
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    $\begingroup$ Questions about "how", rather than "whether" are entirely on topic. This is a narrow question asking for a plausible mechanism to obtain an effect. It is entirely on topic here, and even though I cannot personally imagine an answer better than the one given by @Willk, that doesn't mean there aren't any out there waiting to be given. $\endgroup$ – Dewi Morgan Dec 5 '18 at 19:01
  • $\begingroup$ Hello S.Sethi. On-topic questions here are about worldbuilding, meaning the rules or systems of your world and their consistent use or application. This question is off-topic because it's storybuilding, meaning the question is about the circumstances of a story, not the rules or systems of the world in which the story takes place. $\endgroup$ – JBH Dec 5 '18 at 19:48
  • $\begingroup$ @DewiMorgan, Questions about "how to achieve an effect" are only on-topic when they are in a worldbuilding context. Storybuilding is and has always been off-topic here. $\endgroup$ – JBH Dec 5 '18 at 19:51
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    $\begingroup$ @JBH: At worldbuilding.meta.stackexchange.com/questions/3300/… your answer has the fewest upvotes, as you seem to disagree at a core level with the community consensus from all other answers ("focus on what is possible", "whether a specific element of a back story [...] is possible or likely is probably on topic", "Will vs Can"), etc. I note that no other questions under the "Poison" tag seem to fit your "systems only" definition of "on topic", either. $\endgroup$ – Dewi Morgan Dec 5 '18 at 20:25
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The problem with paralysis is that if caused by a systemic toxin, it would also paralyze the muscles of respiration. A person would stop breathing and die (as with strychnine, below). The sort of paralysis you describe (sudden, irreversible, but you keep breathing) sounds more like high spinal cord trauma - a lesion at C5 would leave the arms able to move just a little but the diaphragm could still move and so you could breathe - you would be a quadriplegic. Your face, mouth etc would all move fine as well. It is really tricky to cut your cervical spinal cord with something you swallow; certainly that would not happen predictably.

If this is a work of fiction, invent some poison that suits your purpose. Animal venoms (toad, pufferfish, snake) are perennial favorites. Mushrooms might paralyze someone who ate them. Some seeds and nuts can cause paralysis; strychnine is an example.

None of these will work if your real intent is to paralyze someone in the real world. They will be detectable, transient, not work if eaten or will be lethal. But if your intent is plausible fiction, read on these and then invent some hybrid of your own that your character can access.

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    $\begingroup$ Hello Willk, Thanks for answering my question. I admire you for answering my question and I am upvoting it. $\endgroup$ – S. Sethi Dec 7 '18 at 13:34
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Ad to Wilks information a personal unique suceptibility for the paralysed brother, ie he has a cronic spinal pain that worsens dramatically with the poison.

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As @Willk points out, neurological damage from a specific point of the spine on down basically means spinal cord damage, and "It is really tricky to cut your cervical spinal cord with something you swallow; certainly that would not happen predictably."

That said... this is not true if micro- or nano-machines are commonplace in your world. Let's consider both.

Micromachine

A small-pill-sized machine could cause that damage by, say, latching to the back of the throat and then stabbing back through into the spine with a coiled needle. This would likely be felt to the drinker, unless it somehow avoided being felt. There's no real advantage to doing this compared to stabbing the back of the neck, other than that an immediate search of the area would show no weapon that could have achieved it, and if the machine were made to degrade in the body, it might never be discovered.

This all requires technology we have not yet developed, for adhering, piercing, aiming, damaging, hiding, and more.

Nanomachine

A very tiny machine (or cluster of machines) could migrate microscopically through the body to that location in the body, then cause damage there. This is difficult to detect, though examination of the area might show the type of damage one would expect of a nanomachine.

Better, it could cause the body itself to cause damage there by inflammation, apoptosis etc. This is slower acting, though, since it works at biological timescales rather than mechanical ones, but does make the actions of the machine near-impossible to detect.

Either way, this requires a far higher tech level than the pill-sized internal assassin.

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    $\begingroup$ Hi Dewi, Thanks for answering my question. $\endgroup$ – S. Sethi Dec 7 '18 at 13:38

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