0
$\begingroup$

The problem in my fictional future Earth was: almost the entire ozone layer disappeared due to a massive release of CFCs in the atmosphere. I was trying to calculate if this would lead to the oceans evaporating, and I didn’t want that to happen, I still need the Earth to be habitable to have a story. According to this post: https://www.reddit.com/r/falloutlore/comments/3e4fp8/how_much_energy_would_it_take_to_boil_the_oceans/
the oceans boiling would not be achieved even if all land-mass was being nuked, let alone if just the ozone layer was missing. I get it now, stupid question. Now I have a new problem but I will do more research on this: it might not be possible for humans to generate the required amount of CFCs to obliterate all ozone.

$\endgroup$

closed as too broad by Renan, RonJohn, Separatrix, L.Dutch Nov 14 '18 at 11:09

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    $\begingroup$ "What is the effect of the ozone layer on the oceans?" is a good question for earthscience.SE. $\endgroup$ – RonJohn Nov 14 '18 at 6:57
  • $\begingroup$ If you leave it long enough everything will evaporate. Might take longer than the age of the universe though... $\endgroup$ – Joe Bloggs Nov 14 '18 at 10:17
  • $\begingroup$ Narrowed the question to make it keep-able. Also, to keep it in line with the answers (to the title). $\endgroup$ – kingledion Nov 14 '18 at 11:58
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ your edit made the question more confusing: I get you had a problem, posted your question and now you see your question is meaningless and have another problem which you will investigate. Can you clarify? $\endgroup$ – L.Dutch Nov 15 '18 at 6:52
4
$\begingroup$

No.

The oceans formed probably sometime before 4 billion years ago. It took billions of years for photosynthesizing bacteria to arise & then produce enough oxygen to oxidize all the iron in the oceans, and only then begin to accumulate in the atmosphere. Only a long interval after that then, for the ozone layer to form in the upper atmosphere.

In short, the oceans existed for billions of years in an atmosphere without any oxygen at all, never mind an ozone layer.

$\endgroup$
2
$\begingroup$

No

enter image description here

I think this is the eighth time I've posted this picture. I'm keeping track. It is from Wikipedia.

The oceans will leak into space if the right function of average temperature and escape velocity is met. This is designated by the "water (vapour)" (how British!) line on the graph above.

For the Earth, the escape velocity is constant, so average surface temperature will have to increase into the ~600 K range before water vapor starts escaping into space. Ozone depletion will not cause that, so the oceans will not escape, even if you raised the planetary temperatures to > 373 K to boil them.

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

The Ozone layer blocks the UV rays. Removing the Ozone layer will kill all life on earth. For ocean life, excessive UV Rays can impair Photosynthesis. For your question, we take this as an example, get a glass bottle, lock it up, cover it with paper then leave it under the sun. Then get another bottle, lock it up, then leave it under the sun.

as far as how much time we can fix this, the answer is, until the world in gets rid of CFC on every materials AND the CFC present in our atmosphere dissipates, there is no stopping the degradation of the ozone layer.

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ "...will kill all life on earth." Not true. Life existed on earth before the formation of the ozone layer and would still exist if it suddenly disappeared. It would drastically change life on earth, but not exterminate it. $\endgroup$ – ColonelPanic Nov 14 '18 at 10:45
  • $\begingroup$ @ColonelPanic Citation please. $\endgroup$ – Mr.J Nov 15 '18 at 4:29
  • $\begingroup$ Not sure citation for what, and since links in comments don't work so nicely, I'll give you some google search terms and allow you to pick from the plethora of definitive sources. For whether there was life before the ozone layer, try searching: "life before the ozone layer".... And to verify that the ozone is healing in parts and degrading in others (but likely not due to CFCs): "is the ozone layer actually healing?". Science is still out on the cause, but the near complete global ban on the known CFCs causing issues has given at least some level of recovery. $\endgroup$ – ColonelPanic Nov 15 '18 at 11:16
  • $\begingroup$ @ColonelPanic WOW, bacteria... Well atleast bacteria will still live when 99% of life dies. I get your point. The OP however, indicated almost the entire ozone layer disappeared due to a massive release of CFCs in the atmosphere so the healing part might not work, currently we have bans for CFC but... There's still no stopping it... nice try though. $\endgroup$ – Mr.J Nov 16 '18 at 0:32

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.