Since granite is hardness level 6.5 this would require either diamond tipped tools or perhaps iron-carbide rotary saws and such. Some of the inner granite is high in Quartz crystal, likely due to it's piezo-electric effect, which is level 7 hardness. (see: https://www.ianknapper.com/infographic/mohs-stone-hardness-scale-infographic/ )

Could it be that high pressure water tools may have been used? This might explain why there are none left to this day. Here is a video showing water used to cut granite: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XuTV6HiPyi8

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closed as off-topic by Giter, RonJohn, Vincent, elemtilas, kingledion Nov 11 at 4:28

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

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  • 3
    Hi Tomachi, and welcome to Worldbuilding! Is your question about the real-world historical tools used to build the Giza pyramids? If so, such a question might be a better fit for the History stackexchange. If you're asking about ways to make the Giza pyramids in a fictional world, we'll need to know a bit more about your background and story. – Dubukay Nov 11 at 2:13
  • 3
    First, ask on History Stack Exchange. Second, it definitely was no water pressure tools, the technology to support that did not exist. Third, a NOVA recreation of pyramid building methods demonstrated that copper tools could effectively cut granite, as long as you were willing to spend a lot of time re-sharpening tools. – kingledion Nov 11 at 4:35
  • Granite was used a a construction stone in all times, from the deepest antiquity to our days. The Egyptians even made colossal granite statues of pharaohs, such as Amenhotep III. The Roman-built walls of Lugo (3rd century CE) have towers with bases of dressed granite stones. The Romans most certainly did not have diamond tipped tools or iron-carbide rotary saws. There are people today who are building a castle using purely medival technology, including quarying the stone and dressing it. – AlexP Nov 11 at 9:14

Most stone is limestone, which is much easier to cut.
Granite was cracked, or worked with granite hammers
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Pyramid_of_Giza#Materials
https://www.ucl.ac.uk/museums-static/digitalegypt/tools/stone.html

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