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I have a human-like dragon that can hang upside down from trees by its tail and without the aid of its other limbs. What I am struggling with is how the scales on its tail have to be arranged to allow full flexibility while still allowing sufficient protection.

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    $\begingroup$ It would probably look like a dragon tail, rather than a duck tail or a fish tail. $\endgroup$ – Renan Nov 4 '18 at 20:06
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    $\begingroup$ How big is your dragon, there was a group of large extinct reptiles with prehensile tails that had a claw at the end. Drepanosauromorpha is clearly doing something really weird. $\endgroup$ – John Nov 4 '18 at 20:27
  • $\begingroup$ Your question is too story based. Worldbuilding doesn't handle "how do I describe" kinds of questions. $\endgroup$ – elemtilas Nov 4 '18 at 22:23
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    $\begingroup$ @elemtilas The criteria are TOO story based. I am surprised how many WBers seem to be blind to the word "too". Even if this question was story based. At worst, it is only about a description of a creature, which is a minor element of a work of fiction at best. As a worldbuilding element it can be construed as how part of a creature might function. $\endgroup$ – a4android Nov 5 '18 at 1:29
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    $\begingroup$ A prehensile tail on a dragon would be similar to how the body of a snake functions in wrapping itself around a branch. if a reptile like a snake can do without problems, then a dragon should be able to do likewise. $\endgroup$ – a4android Nov 5 '18 at 1:31
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Some geckos and chameleons have prehensile tails. For example, the Indian chameleon, Chamaeleo zeylanicus:

Indian chameleon

Indian chameleon, Chamaeleo zeylanicus, showing its prehensile tail. Photograph by M.arunprasad, available on Wikimedia under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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    $\begingroup$ prehensile tails look the same in pretty much anything that has them, all that varies is hat they are covered in. $\endgroup$ – John Nov 4 '18 at 20:23

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