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So I've been thinking about Stasis Fields lately, and wondering if there would be any way to create a Stasis Field that would prevent a person or object from feeling the effects of gravity from high-speed acceleration during a flight that would normally crush or kill a human.

Edit: A Stasis Field is normally classified as an area that Stasis takes place, or to put it simply, an area where time is slowed or stopped completely. The way that I'm interpreting a Stasis Field is an area where the laws of gravity and possibly time are negated, which would create an area where humans would not feel the effects of gravity.

Edit #2: It has been brought to my attention that this is not a common message board to ask vague questions to create a discussion, but rather to ask very specific questions that can be re-enforced by the community. Would anyone have a suggestion on another message board where I could ask more vague questions such as these without disrupting the community's flow?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Mołot, GrandmasterB, JBH, elemtilas, Gryphon Oct 25 '18 at 0:55

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ What is a stasis field and how does it work? I'm not aware of a stasis field being a real thing, so you'll have to explain what it does. $\endgroup$ – kingledion Oct 24 '18 at 15:55
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    $\begingroup$ Speed doesn't kill; acceleration kills. $\endgroup$ – RonJohn Oct 24 '18 at 15:58
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    $\begingroup$ Sounds a LOT like a 'Bobble" from Vinge's 'The Peace War' series ...scifi.stackexchange.com/questions/152569/… $\endgroup$ – Joe Oct 24 '18 at 16:05
  • $\begingroup$ Sounds like the semi-ubiquitous Sci-Fi dodge the "inertial damper" (referred to I believe in both Star Wars and Star Trek canons) - mysterious device or field negating inertia / momentum within its reach so that sudden changes in velocity & vector of ship don't result in redout / blackout / dismemberment of personnel or destruction of cargo. NASA and ESA answer to this problem: accelerate gently for longer time. Keep accelerating at a steady rate throughout journey till midpoint; rotate vehicle 180° at same now-opposite vector thrust; no acceleration shock & pseudo-gravity. $\endgroup$ – GerardFalla Oct 24 '18 at 16:43
  • $\begingroup$ So would time be stopped at the surface of the sphere or inside as well? If the latter, the human body would exist as a uniform probability of particles inside the sphere with no guarantees of putting it back as before. If the former, how you create such a null space on the interior determines how a body inside would behave $\endgroup$ – nzaman Oct 24 '18 at 17:04
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If no time passes in a statis field, then the objects within the field will feel no gravity, because nothing can move without time. From the time the stasis field "closes" around them, until it opens, nothing can happen inside it. That includes any movement, thinking, biology, chemical reactions, electronics, gravity, etc.

However, if that is the case, then it is logically impossible for the stasis field to be generated from INSIDE the sphere, it must be generated from OUTSIDE, by a machine of some sort that can emit a field that stops time.

That machinery is not protected from gravity, and must be turned on and off (by a timer perhaps), but will itself be subject to aging, gravity, destruction, etc. So on an approach to a black hole, the occupants inside the stasis field would be perfectly safe, until gravitational shear from the black hole broke the stasis field machine and exposed the occupants to -- surprise -- being ripped apart by a black hole.

The same would likely be true for falling into a star, or being at ground-zero for a nuclear bomb. Once the machine is destroyed, no more stasis field.

But for the purpose of acceleration at 1000G or whatever, if the machine can take it, the people in the stasis field will be fine. It will turn on, they can accelerate for centuries, when it turns off they will feel (and be) as if the trip took an instant.

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If you want to protect people from crushing acceleration, you could take a page from air forces worldwide. Jet pilots wear suits that are either pressurized with air, or contains liquids. The idea is to use fluids to protect the pilot from the shock of acceleration just like the womb would protect a fetus.

If you still wish to go with antigravity because of the law of cool, be advised... Simply negating gravity would make an object buoyant in any atmosphere, since they would be lighter than any surrounding gas. In fact they might shoot up the atmosphere like Lawnchair Larry, but they would never stop.

Even worse, without gravity to bind a body to a planet, or even to the planet's star itself, that body is going to be eventually shot out into intergalactic medium.

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Consider a stasis bubble.

A Stasis field would exist as a spherical standing wave in the fabric of space generated from it’s center by a device able to push the fabric away from itself forming an enclosed sphere effectively isolating itself from the rest of the universe. Being isolated there would be no information exchange between the inside and outside. The outside of the sphere would indeed appear as a totally reflective spherical surface.

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to the site, Bigdog. Please note that the Worldbuilding SE is dedicated to providing detailed answers to specific questions a user has while developing his/her fictional world. We are not a typical discussion forum; answers are expected to answer the question that was asked. As is, this is liable to be deleted as inadequate. Feel free to take the tour and check out our site culture. $\endgroup$ – Frostfyre Oct 24 '18 at 16:21
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    $\begingroup$ The first paragraph is too conversational, and it does not answer the question. I would recommend removing that one. Your second paragraph looks fine, though. $\endgroup$ – John Locke Oct 24 '18 at 17:08

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