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I am interested in the idea of creating a story around a world where cheap stasis pods exist. So stasis costs would be a fraction of normal living costs. So people that are poor could choose to spend all their money on getting put into stasis for the next 10 year's and hope for new technologies or changes that would make life better in the future instead or dealing with being poor.

My idea is that in a world with cheap stasis technologies could have a large percentage of the population end up being stored in large warehouse style stasis facilities. With people using stasis as a way to travel to the future and to try and find a better life.

I am interested in figuring out what use of cheap statis pods would be the use that would fundamental change society? So what specific use of the technology would change society the most?

Some examples I have thought of: Get ride of orphanages and foster care and store kids in stasis instead, could change sociaty because everyone would have a "good" upbringing. Prisoners stored in stasis, might not view prison as a bad option. Hospitals using stasis as as way manage waiting lists for surgeries, could increase the length of waiting list.

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closed as too broad by Mołot, dot_Sp0T, Giter, Blade Wraith, Raditz_35 Oct 12 '18 at 13:31

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ Hello. Please see Is broad impact of a specific change too broad? on Meta. $\endgroup$ – Mołot Oct 12 '18 at 12:01
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    $\begingroup$ As always, there is a relevant XKCD for this question $\endgroup$ – Chronocidal Oct 12 '18 at 13:09
  • $\begingroup$ "How would the everything in the world be affected by X" is almost always too broad. However, since you seem to be particularly interested in whether or not poorer people would use them to travel to the future, an equivalent but much more specific question would be something like "Would a poor person be able to live a better life by traveling X years into the future" $\endgroup$ – Giter Oct 12 '18 at 13:11
  • $\begingroup$ Biggest users will be older people delaying death (want to see grandchildren grow up), hoping for better medicine, and saving money. This last bit will mean that government retirement schemes will collapse, or will have to cut payments for those in stasis, leading to black market for stasis. Then again, they can rent their houses on AirBnB while they are under, and pay for themselves $\endgroup$ – Bald Bear Oct 12 '18 at 16:11
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    $\begingroup$ Other applications. Putting children into stasis b/c parents cannot afford to take care of them. Sex trafficking: put 14 year old into stasis until she is 18 (at least on paper). Minimum-wage workers spending weekends in stasis to save money. $\endgroup$ – Bald Bear Oct 12 '18 at 16:14
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This wouldn't be such a good choice for the poor, simply because whatever technical skill they have would be completely out of date by the time they get out of the pod, someone with an engineer degree that has simply skipped the last ten years of development will be completely out of the loop and without any starting money, he would have a big problem ahead of him.

The Rich on the other hand would have much use for this technology, since they can have hired people managing their money and simply skip ahead a couple of years without having to worry about their own skills or job security.

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    $\begingroup$ I agree with this Answer. A better option for poor is to go into stasis pod once a month, when their money run out, and until the next welfare check. There was an SF story where people used such stasis to share apartments with strangers. $\endgroup$ – Bald Bear Oct 12 '18 at 15:26
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    $\begingroup$ And of course The Sliced-Crosswise Only-On-Tuesday World by Philip José Farmer. $\endgroup$ – AlexP Oct 12 '18 at 15:33
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    $\begingroup$ Thanks @AlexP, you read my mind. More on unemployed people: spending time in stasis means their work skill are more out of date, so its vicious circle. You can get to loan sharks finding ways to keeping people in stasis indefinitely while pocketing their welfare checks. $\endgroup$ – Bald Bear Oct 12 '18 at 16:17

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