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Let's suppose you can travel back in time by passing your state of mind/memories to your former self. You go back to your former self who has slept some hours ago, a day passes without sleeping and you travel back in time again, and you repeat this process dozens of times (presumably to try to change an event you dont want to happen) . Would your former self have the accumulated tiredness of dozens of days (needing to sleep) or since the body of your former self slept a few hours ago would you feel energetic without needing to sleep all the time?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Renan, elemtilas, Palarran, Mołot, StephenG Sep 30 '18 at 9:15

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ The need for sleep is physiological, just like thirst or hunger. It has nothing to do with state of mind and memories. So it depends on what effort the brain does when it receives those memories and state of mind; if the process is arduous then the brain will need sleep; and in this case it will happen from the first time. P.S. No matter how many times the process is repeated, from the point of view of the past you it happens always for the first time... $\endgroup$ – AlexP Sep 30 '18 at 1:30
  • $\begingroup$ @Alexp it depends if tiredness is caused by processing new memories. There are more new unprocessed memories each time0 $\endgroup$ – Richard Tingle Sep 30 '18 at 7:44
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This is a wonderful opportunity to give your science fiction story a bigger science than we currently possess. We have no minds that are independent of the bodies they are currently attached to, so we have no way of testing whether mental weariness is separate and distinct from physical weariness.

I have personally noticed that my mind slows down after 16-18 hours of concentration, but the timing of that slow down is suspiciously close to other symptoms of physical tiredness such as muscle tightening, yawning, and gradually increasing eyelid weight. I cannot empirically determine whether two simultaneous events are occurring (separate physical and mental tiring) or if it is a single event with multiple distinct symptoms.

Your time traveler has an opportunity to learn what we do not know. Does the mind tire separately from the body?

So choose whichever "truth" serves your story best and run with it.

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    $\begingroup$ This is a surprisingly excellent non-answer $\endgroup$ – Dubukay Sep 30 '18 at 3:00
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    $\begingroup$ @Dubukay It's actually an example of the experimental method in action. Metempsychosis as a form of time travel might have unexpected effects. This would be a world where the mind-body duality is a real phenomenon. $\endgroup$ – a4android Sep 30 '18 at 4:27
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    $\begingroup$ @Dubukay it's not. The answer is that science has not progressed enough to know what will happen. $\endgroup$ – The Great Duck Sep 30 '18 at 5:58

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