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I have been thinking of a "realistic" and near future scenario where an Emirati construction company manage to build a twin of the Eiffel Tower, on the Champ de Mars next to the original one. This twin is placed very close (I do not have any measurements for now) to the original, permitting the construction of a bridge between the first floors of both towers.

The twin is an exact copy of the original. The only differences would be in which company provided the antennae, where the steel were molded and who built it (the original was built by (if I remember correctly) Gustave Eiffel's company in the late 1880's, while the twin one was built by an Emirati company around the early 2030's in which I set the scenario). The tower itself would cost the company around 28 million dollars according to some estimates if we were to build a twin of the tower today in real life (the original cost 38 million euros (however back then euro did not exist it was the franc))

But why would anyone build a twin of the Eiffel Tower in Paris next to the original? What are the possible reasons to do so in a modern contemporary world (similar to 2018)?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Mołot, Gryphon, Frostfyre, kingledion, elemtilas Sep 18 '18 at 16:34

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Original was for show. Why would you need any other reason for a copy? Also, what are criteria to judge good answers from bad ones? $\endgroup$ – Mołot Sep 18 '18 at 16:03
  • $\begingroup$ Have to agree with Mołot on this. "Because my story says so" is just as acceptable as "The original was failing and needed to be replaced because repairing was too costly." $\endgroup$ – Frostfyre Sep 18 '18 at 16:33
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    $\begingroup$ Just a side note: the Eiffel tower is built of wrought iron, not steel. Steel was very expensive at that time; only 36 years earlier, a 2 ton steel ingot presented by the German firm Krupp was a phenomenal never seen before attraction at the 1851 Great Exhibition in London. $\endgroup$ – AlexP Sep 18 '18 at 17:04
  • $\begingroup$ Hello Victorbrine. Please read our Meta entries for Primarily Opinion-Based Questions and High Concept questions to better understand how to reopen your question. $\endgroup$ – JBH Sep 18 '18 at 22:26
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There’s an exact duplicate of the Lascaux cave and its prehistoric paintings near the original one, because the original was being damaged by the number of visitors. The same might apply to the Eiffel Tower in future, and as with the cave this might be the best way to give visitors the experience without damaging the original.

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Publicity stunt.

The company constructing the copy of the tower 3d prints it over the course of a work week with apparatus set up near by, then assembles it the following week. The idea is that any desired structure can be printed on demand and assembled on short notice. Next on the tour, the owners plan to take down the new tower and reuse the materials to print a copy of "The Motherland Calls" in Volgograd.

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    $\begingroup$ But just like the original, Parisians fall in love with the copy, plans to take it down are shelved indefinitely, and Eiffel Tower Deux becomes a permanent and iconic part of the skyline! $\endgroup$ – Nuclear Wang Sep 18 '18 at 16:31
  • $\begingroup$ Excellent answer. Original tower was also a publicity stunt. Modern copy should focus on speed lower cost, or less material use. E.g. replace classic metal trusses with this: gizmodo.com/5964609/… $\endgroup$ – Bald Bear Sep 18 '18 at 17:05

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