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Here is the scenario:

In a fantasy world filled with orcs, dragons and other magic critters, most countries live relativly simple, as magic provides most things to life with strong king or other sort of goverment.

But there is one city on the continent, that had found something more valuable than gold: natural swamp gas. It burns hotter than coal, is cheap to extract and just slightly dangerous.

Thus a giant city grew in the middle of the swamp land, growing up in 4 giant towers build like gigantic christmas trees of metal, while lower branches sink into the ground, they just build it up slightly higher than before.

As the industries grew, many people came to work here and find their luck, even many mages to provide their services to those without the knowledge of the arcane. Even they everyone knows, metal and magic are a no-no.

The requesition:

  • Magic can be used to archive everything, but may take a was amount of effort, time and mages. So more complex things like creating "life" would take at least a lifespan of a mage to cast. So Golems exist, but may take several years to be created.

  • Magic is based on "free energy", that can be formed and restructured to useful effects

  • The size of a magical effect is proportional to time a caster uses to cast a spell, OR is very dangerous and can cause demonic invasions.
  • Magic is hindered and even prevented by metal, especially moving metal, but can't change the effect wished for.
  • The industrial state is mostly steam engines with the twist of the use of swamp gas or coal enriched with swamp gas.

The question:

In this industrializes city, mages work and offer their services like fortune telling, healing and even teleportation (while extremly dangerouns in this city), but what jobs could a mage have in a factory as worker or other role?

Additionally, you can even give crazy arguments like "to lit fires in the smellting oven" (only job i came up with), cause mages accept every job as being very desperate and factory owners ignore dangers with possible "good ideas" for more profit.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Renan, JBH, Ash, Clay Deitas, Cort Ammon Sep 10 '18 at 17:59

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ IT. It is practically black magic. $\endgroup$ – Renan Sep 10 '18 at 16:27
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    $\begingroup$ This question is intrisically primarily opinion-based. You need to explain the criteria for a single, best answer. For example, why would "He could always be a janitor" be better or worse than "He'd make a great demolition expert!" Whenever asking for a list-of-things answer, you need to tell us how you will judge the answers. $\endgroup$ – JBH Sep 10 '18 at 16:43
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    $\begingroup$ Unfortunately I have to agree with the others. At best, this is a supply and demand issue, so the answer is simple "The mages will go do what jobs pay enough or are satisfying enough to warrant the training that went into them." The answers to that depend heavily on all the intricate details of your magic systems, your culture, etc. Personally, I'd write stories where the mages become healers, because that has a lot of job satisfaction -- you'd do it even if industrialization crushes your salary cap with industrialized medicine. $\endgroup$ – Cort Ammon Sep 10 '18 at 18:01
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    $\begingroup$ But it would be trivial to develop a story where that isn't a domain where mages work. Heck, it'd be fun to write a story where mages teach martial arts. The martial arts themselves may not require magic, but the chosen teaching process might. Then, those who want to be martial arts teachers would have to pick up magic. $\endgroup$ – Cort Ammon Sep 10 '18 at 18:02
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    $\begingroup$ Or perhaps magic based cooking, which relies on textures that can only be constructed via magical means. There's a lot of limits to modern culinary tools which would not apply to magic ones. (And you see how varied those three solutions are. If you were to change the question, you might be able to make it easier for us to identify which of those three is "best." That would help with gathering re-open votes by making it less opinion based. There's always a fine balance between opinion based and story based.) $\endgroup$ – Cort Ammon Sep 10 '18 at 18:05
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It sounds like Magic is just harder when near metal and not impossible. Thus, careful creation of magic sigils/circles geared towards being hardy against the effects of the nearby metal could be introduced to allow magic in an area. The maintenance of such sigils and then the casting of useful magic inside could then be possible.

Now that our mages can cast, What can they do in an industrialized world. They could work together to maintain and introduce a golem workforce for the more dangerous tasks. If one mage can create a golem in 10 years then 4 mages might be able to create one in 3 (as for the time difference...too many cooks and all that). A small network of mages working together could provide industries with golems to lower human casualties.

Thats about all I could think about without know more about the limitations of your magic. I suppose teleportation circles or other forms of transportation for industrialized products might be suitable as well.

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I don't see any reason why you can't just have these guys running around curing cancer. I mean it would take time and mages, but wouldn't that be a plus since it would keep them employed?

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  • $\begingroup$ Sure, as i said they providing services. whice could entail those luxury healing tasks! $\endgroup$ – PSquall Sep 10 '18 at 22:04

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