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In warlords the Hegemony already has practical usage for cryosleep (no clue how it would be enduced just yet) in the medical field and in long voyages, ex: freighter travelling from Uranus to Ceres. As well as planned voyages to exo-planets.

One issue I've seen brought up in multiple cryosleep questions is the body getting too cold and the cells being damaged. I saw on a recent cryofreeze question someone bring up using an antifreeze of some sorts.

That got me thining, but I'm by no means a chemist (barely passed chemistry in high school, lmao). What kind of chemical, liquid, or material would be the best fit for the job?

Notes:

  1. It can't be something magical, but it could be something possible to create, but isn't around just yet

  2. Ignore other effects of cryosleep. I'm focusing on this piece by piece.

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  • $\begingroup$ -1 "The question does not show any research effort". en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryopreservation $\endgroup$ – RonJohn Aug 25 '18 at 3:50
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    $\begingroup$ @RonJohn I didn't know if the stuff that preserves Organs would keep a intact human alive. Next time I'll do more research. $\endgroup$ – Celestial Dragon Emperor Aug 25 '18 at 4:03
  • $\begingroup$ It can't really, and someone reading sci fi will (hopefully!) know that. But that's not the point. It just needs to be reasonable, based on genre expectations. $\endgroup$ – RonJohn Aug 25 '18 at 4:08
  • $\begingroup$ Fingers crossed that they'll find or make some weird liquid one day. $\endgroup$ – Celestial Dragon Emperor Aug 25 '18 at 4:11
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Ethanol.

I tried this with fruit flies once. My theory: fruit fly larvae must freeze solid inside fallen autumn fruit in the northern winter, and survive thru till spring. Fruit fly larvae are super ethanol tolerant because fruit is full of ethanol.

Ethanol dehydrates cells. A mix with water lowers the freezing point of water. A mix with sugar and water would lower the freezing point even more. As opposed to salt, ethanol and sugar can both be dealt with metabolically.

Empirically, drunks survive freezing / cold water drowning better than non-drunk people.

The flies did fine with vodka and could rally (back in plain banana mush) after swimming around in it. But I think I froze them too cold and none woke up.

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    $\begingroup$ I knew the Russians knew something we didn't... $\endgroup$ – Celestial Dragon Emperor Aug 25 '18 at 3:59
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Hydrogen Sulfide has apparently been successfully used in research on suspended animation. The researchers managed to put a mouse into that state and revive him. Obviously your stasis chambers would be far more sophisticated, but their technology might be based on this type of discovery.

https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn10252-rotten-egg-gas-puts-mice-in-suspended-animation/

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You could flash freeze people. The problem with any freezing is that when the water inside cells freezes, it becomes ice. Ice crystals are pointy and ice takes up more space than water, so the ice can rupture cells.

To stop the ice from killing the person's cells, you can flash freeze them. Flash freezing makes smaller ice crystals than normal freezing, decreasing the number of cells that rupture. However, ice is still less dense than water and therefore takes up more space in the cell, meaning the cell might still burst. To stop the cell from bursting, you can dry out the cells (warning: do not use on live humans). This is not an option unless you want human apricots. Instead, you can attempt to equalize the pressure on both sides of the cell membrane.

If you immerse a human in a tub of water and flash freeze them, (hopefully) when the water in and out of the cell will try to expand and find that they can't because the pressure of the expanding water on both sides is equal.

To do this, the water surrounding the cells and the water inside needs to freeze at the same time. If one freezes before the other, the ice will rip the cell apart. To get any pressure, the tub must be fully enclosed and built with something strong enough to resist the pressure of the expanding ice. If the tub is not enclosed the ice in the tub will have room to expand and will not push against the water inside the cells. If both of these conditions are met you will have a frozen human. It shouldn't matter what unfreezes first, because then the volume of the water/ice will decrease. If you perform the procedure wrong, the cells will rupture and it is best to keep the person frozen if that happens so you do not have any legal issues until you have called up your lawyers and prepared your defense.

To quickly melt the ice, you can expose the person to a vacuum, which will make the ice around them sublimate almost instantly and probably kill the person but do what you wish.

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Well you would have to use antifreeze on a cellular level, so I doubt that would work, but just adding salt or sugar is enough to give you a couple extra degrees. Assuming biological processes within cells shut down at 32°, that tiny change is all you need.

If the purpose of freezing cells is that they only stop functioning when frozen solid, then you need to find a liquid that doesn't expand when frozen, or remove a small amount of water so the ice doesn't rupture the cell wall.

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