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I'm designing an Anthropomorphic Lu-pine. (Get it? Cuz it's technically a tree, but it looks like a werewolf.) They are mobile, omnivorous plants, slightly larger than the average person. They are entirely plant but have developed pulvinar cells which act as muscles and various other systems to allow them to function similar to animals, however they have cell walls and photosynthesise.

By following Plantae taxonomy I came to the conclusion that they are classified as a type of conifer tree. That means they have pine cones (which is ok), but I also want them to have an animal aspect to it, but how would I incorporate this?

One idea I had was have the cone act like an egg. After the 'egg' is pollinated by one way or another, it is 'laid'. But then what? Should it be free moving from the get-go or should it start off rooted in place? Should they give live birth or gestate underground?

Any ideas for a method of development?

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    $\begingroup$ Pinecones are already eggs, more or less. We'll need more detail on what your creature is like before you can get more than random opinions, especially on the combination of plant and animal. $\endgroup$ – Upper_Case-Stop Harming Monica Aug 5 '18 at 0:19
  • $\begingroup$ @Upper_Case I know that. What I meant was should they bury it like a plant or hatch it like an animal? $\endgroup$ – ZoneWolf Aug 5 '18 at 1:19
  • $\begingroup$ what's not clear to me is what features your creature has that are plantlike and animal like. As described it just sounds like an animal-- what plantlike feature does it have? $\endgroup$ – Upper_Case-Stop Harming Monica Aug 5 '18 at 1:31
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    $\begingroup$ It actually is a plant. As stated in the question, it is classified as a conifer, a division of tree. It is a plant that has developed to be mobile. It has cell walls, chlorophyll, it photosynthesises. However, it is mobile by means of pulvinar cells and functions similar to an animal completely through cells found in plants. $\endgroup$ – ZoneWolf Aug 5 '18 at 2:23
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    $\begingroup$ @Zonewolf your plantimal has better be capable of metabolising foodstuffs as well, or there’s no way it can meet the energy requirements for such high mobility. $\endgroup$ – Joe Bloggs Aug 5 '18 at 8:44
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Plants aren't typically known for caring for their young. They spread their seeds around and hope for the best. Wolfs and werewolves are typically pack animals. The young are dependent on their mother's milk for nutrients (and protection) in the early years and are slowly weaned off to become independant. Lots of mammals also have shared care for the young. I suggest you alter your trees to become more mammal-like. Have your mother lupine tree carry the egg until it's 'hatched' (sprouted), similar to a kangaroo pouch.

  • Your mother-tree creates a sac/bucket/pot type feature that is filled in with soil and fertiliser. This can be supplemented by the nutrients from the mother tree if you so wish.
  • the fertilised pinecone (egg) is laid in this portable pot of earth and allowed to gestate and sprout like any normal sapling.
  • once the sapling has reached a certain maturity it can start uprooting itself and exploring the nearby vicinity outside of the pot. It can return to the pot to 'nurse' periodically for extra nutrients (as well as protection from herbivores), until it is considered 'weaned'.
  • your sapling is then independent of the mother-tree and will slowly/rapidly grow into a mature lupine tree of it's own.
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    $\begingroup$ This could handily be facilitated by a layer of moss on the back. The moss traps the soil inbetween specialised ridges on the parent’s back, and nursing wolves start to look like potting benches. $\endgroup$ – Joe Bloggs Aug 5 '18 at 8:42
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for this. I started looking into wolf pups and raising, which gave me some ideas using something like what you said about a bucket/pot feature filled with soil, but instead of being on the mother, it could be more like a den. But since they need light to photosynthesise and grow, it can't be underground. So maybe they could be on a raised plateau or even in a hollowed tree, so they have light and are safe from predators. They could even have a root-tail that keeps them there until they are strong enough to uproot themselves and leave. Because why not. $\endgroup$ – ZoneWolf Aug 5 '18 at 12:37
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    $\begingroup$ @ZoneWolf, you can also have this pot or hollow at the top of the mother/den tree to allow photosynthesis. I'm assuming your older lu-pines would be sentient and mobile enough to know to move any overhanging branches out of the way for the little munchkins. Also, moving the gap in the branches through the course of day/season, sort of like sunflower heads following the direction of the sun. $\endgroup$ – EveryBitHelps Aug 5 '18 at 14:16
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    $\begingroup$ You could also have a multi-generational rearing system. Ie a young tree fertilises an egg and then goes to an older, possibly more static, tree to plant the seed in the hollow. You could have many trees planting their seeds in the same grandmother tree, creating your den-like situation. $\endgroup$ – EveryBitHelps Aug 5 '18 at 14:21

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