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In near future earth become overpopulated. The most populated countries issued birth control law. However,the government is unable to provide everyone with contraceptive, especially in poor countries.

What kind of punishment government could use for breaking birth control law? (It cannot be money payment since this problem occurs mostly in poor regions)

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Aify, L.Dutch, Vincent, Ash, Mark Olson Jun 24 '18 at 13:56

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ "poor regions" use money too. In fact fines (if enforceable) are most effective against poor, who lose a proportionally greater part of their income, and who have less luxuries to make economies with... In any case you could look up at China's "One child" policy. $\endgroup$ – SJuan76 Jun 23 '18 at 10:50
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    $\begingroup$ Check out china's experience with the"one child" law. In urban areas they had success, but in rural areas, where people were really poor, punishment came down to "you and your family need to start sleeping under a different hedge". $\endgroup$ – pojo-guy Jun 23 '18 at 11:31
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    $\begingroup$ I would imagine A Modest Proposal For preventing the Children of Poor People From being a Burthen to Their Parents or Country, and For making them Beneficial to the Publick has some good ideas. $\endgroup$ – Michael Kutz Jun 23 '18 at 11:52
  • $\begingroup$ An intra-uterine device costs peanuts and works long-term. The real problem is that in those few countries where fertility is still above replacement rate the "government" is mostly powerless and most people ignore it. $\endgroup$ – AlexP Jun 23 '18 at 13:15
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    $\begingroup$ Call me cynical but I think the current penalty is about 2 years of non-stop crying and nappy-duty followed by another 16 years of financial and social death followed by penury in old age. Do we need more punishment ? :-) $\endgroup$ – StephenG Jun 23 '18 at 18:06
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There are a few different options.

  1. Fines. As stated in comments, money does exist in poor regions, and taking it away could be devastating.

  2. Forced separation. Rather than just taking the baby, which would ease the burden of raising it, why not separate the parents? This would be a serious punishment, and it would prevent more children from being born to the same parents. The parents could go to penal colonies, or they could simply be sent to different parts of the country and abandoned there.

  3. Sterilization. This is a method used to enforce real-life one-child policies. If a couple won't stop having children then the government may decide to permanently prevent any more from being born.

  4. Ostracization. Perhaps the family's village is ordered to stop interacting with the family. In a poor region this would be a devastating punishment as the family would be left to fend for themselves without support from the community.

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Historically, the Chinese used a variety of punishments for violation of their "One Child" policy.

  1. If the second child was detected prior to birth, the woman was forced to undergo an abortion. It is thought that infanticide was practiced against children who were already born

  2. Fines were imposed at the Provincial level based on family income

  3. It is also thought that involuntary sterilization of the mother was also carried out in some circumstances.

See https://infogalactic.com/info/One-child_policy#Human_rights_violations

So if a polity is willing to take draconian steps to directly interfere with family planing and the family unit, there is little to suggest they won't stop at extreme measures. You might note that in similar authoritarian regimes, children were often removed from the family unit entirely and raised according to whatever scheme the regime wished to propagate (a pretty extreme example might be the Khmer Rouge regime, which turned children against the parents entirely).

So a regime which turns against families is capable of almost anything.

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Solution 1: Death sentence for the baby if discovered immediately and compense for those who report the crime of birth to the authorities. Parents get sterilized.

Solution 2: Since new, approved births, are supposed to be registered not just with a keyboard or a pen-written register, all new babies' DNA is supposed to be registered in a database and the baby provided with a unique chip. Lack of said chip will prevent any baby that escapes authorities to access all services. No food, no water, no housing, no medicals, no schooling nothing. Parents, their friends and relative will be unable to buy stuff for the baby because they must submit the baby's chip for approval.

Solution 3: even if, and it is possible after point 2, baby should make it into an adult by staying under the radar, there's a death sentence hanging over the adult's head and, retroactively, over everyone who helped the baby back then. This will be imprinted via all communications media to all social strata, from the rich to the poor. The 'citizen X' will live with the knowledge that the slightest mistake will cause the death of many. And everyone in the circle who protected the baby back then will probably break down under pressure.

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Rather than punishment, it might be worth looking at sustainable prevention. In practice, it turns out that the TFR (total fertility rate) correlates with HDI (human development index). That is, countries with a higher HDI have a lower TFR.

Consider the figure below, taken from the Wikipedia page on TFR. enter image description here

While that's only a correlation, I think it would be a mistake not to include this in your thinking process. For example, it might be better to spend the money needed for enforcing the suggested policies on raising human development in those countries.

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