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Is it possible for planet to have gem mountains? That is to say, diamond mountain, emerald mountain etc.

Is it possible for a planet to have soil as a mixture of powders that are different gems?
That is, like glowing sand of ruby, diamond, pearl etc, in the form of dust.

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    $\begingroup$ Please try to give your question a more logic structure. Firing all your questions at once doesn't help getting into them. Give some introduction, explain your problem and then ask your question. In this way we can better understand what you are asking and propose an answer. $\endgroup$ – L.Dutch - Reinstate Monica Jun 18 '18 at 16:37
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    $\begingroup$ What is a "gem"? Normal dirt (a.k.a. "soil") is a mixture of very small particles of mineral and organic material. The mineral part of ordinary dirt is mostly quartz and various feldspars; several varieties of quartz (agate, amethyst, jasper, vermarine) and occasionally varieties of feldspar are routinely cut and polished as gemstones. $\endgroup$ – AlexP Jun 18 '18 at 16:43
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    $\begingroup$ While anything is on-topic and this is by no means the worst example I've seen so far, doing your own research beforehand is encouraged. I believe the question would look differently if you had done even a little bit of research $\endgroup$ – Raditz_35 Jun 18 '18 at 16:57
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    $\begingroup$ sorry, with your edit you made the question worse: at least before it had only one question, though not well introduced. Now you have put two unrelated questions... $\endgroup$ – L.Dutch - Reinstate Monica Jun 18 '18 at 17:19
  • $\begingroup$ Just for infortainment, diamonds rain in Uranus. $\endgroup$ – Renan Jun 18 '18 at 18:13
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Soil is already made by dust of gems.

I.e. sand is mostly silica, and silica is also what makes quartz and opal.

Generally speaking, soil is generated by the weathering of stones, whatever they are, plus some organic matter.

Soil is a mixture of organic matter, minerals, gases, liquids, and organisms that together support life.

Plants can absorb any element which is dissolved into water as ion.

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  • $\begingroup$ Yeah I was going to say this with more technical jargon, this is better. $\endgroup$ – Ash Jun 18 '18 at 16:49
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Carbon planets have been hypothesized since 2005.

I don't know about the other gems, but you could find a true geological abundance of diamond even on their surface...

Such a planet would probably have an iron- or steel-rich core like the known terrestrial planets. Surrounding that would be molten silicon carbide and titanium carbide. Above that, a layer of carbon in the form of graphite, possibly with a kilometers-thick substratum of diamond if there is sufficient pressure. During volcanic eruptions, it is possible that diamonds from the interior could come up to the surface, resulting in mountains of diamonds and silicon carbides. The surface would contain frozen or liquid hydrocarbons (e.g. tar and methane) and carbon monoxide.[5] A weather cycle is theoretically possible on carbon planets with an atmosphere, provided that the average surface temperature is below 77 °C.

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It is plausible, and even very possible, however this planet would need to:

  • Have no or little of oxygen (most crystaline structures are composed of oxygen and additional substances or undergo degradation (similar to rusting) under oxygen; thus most of oxygen would be deprived and/or you should just put less of it in oxygen.

  • Your plants would be composed mostly of atmospheric gases, thus they won't be very crystaline, they would be desolate, because crystals tend to clump together which would make "deserts" of flat crystal plates and occasional patches of broken crystals which would sometimes be viable for plants to live (soaked salt would probably not support most of plants) and your plants would really benefit from nosexual reproduction and seeds working like dandelion ones, however I don't think there is any way for enough plants to make intelligent lifeform develop so if it was what you were looking for then sorry, it would not be too viable.

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Kind of, your question its kinda open because each gem has different properties and form in different ways, there are only three ways of this to happen:

1.- Your planet has an huge pressure within its surface or its a gas giant, it's thought that in some of this places the pressure its so high that diamonds form in the clouds and come raining to lower parts of such atmosphere.

2.- Meteoric origin, given an extraordinary set of coincidences, meteors which had huge mineral deposits impacted on the planet itself in a geologically small amount of time relatively close in time to the present

3.- Mixture of both, in some random event a gas giant loses it's gas leaving behind only its rocky core which could be made entirely of such minerals,

The second one its more complicated as density would make such minerals sink in just a few million years into the soil, that's actually why the Earth surface its so poor in minerals and why we have to dig for them.

Other than that... I don't see any good way of this happening, not in our universe at least

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  • $\begingroup$ But the people of Planet A could own the neighboring Planet B that was rich in gems, if they were advanced enough for space travel. $\endgroup$ – M. A. Golding Jun 18 '18 at 18:16

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