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If there was magic that works like telekinesis in a country similar to 18th century England, would the knowledge level and things that have already been invented/discovered be enough for someone to make a tool that will work with it? Either in the 18th century or before the 18th century. The world currently is in the 18th century but it doesn't mean someone before the 18th couldn't make it. I would actually rather someone make it earlier if they could.

The magic I'm talking about is manipulation of matter using the energy one gets from eating. Only basic manipulation, things you could do physically, nothing too crazy. Stuff like moving a box or heating up some water. Nothing like changing an element into another, or creating matter. Let's say there is an organ in the brain for this purpose. Using the body to do something physically uses less energy than doing the same thing with magic.

In another question, I got my explanation of how my magic might work. How might telekinesis and pyrokinesis work if they were possible?

I'm going with the idea by a4android that people's brains have evolved to the point where they can sense part of the quantum vacuum, the virtual particles. They have also developed an organ to manipulate those particles. It works by spreading it through something like sound waves which influences the virtual particles emerging. Causes virtual photons rise in a coherent "volume" causing the Compton Effect and making the target move. The photons disappear back into the vacuum.

This world has had magic since the beginning, it just wasn't found out or usable until later (like in the Common Era). Is it possible for a smart person, with Georgian era knowledge or knowledge from earlier in the past and their way of thinking, to create a tool that makes magic easier to use? Or something that uses magic for other purposes? If so what would they create and why would they think of creating it? I assume people think of survival first then convenience then entertainment.

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  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to Worldbuilding, Ami L! If you have a moment please take the tour and visit the help center to learn more about the site. You may also find Worldbuilding Meta and The Sandbox (both of which require 5 rep to post on) useful. Have fun! $\endgroup$ – FoxElemental Jun 17 '18 at 20:21
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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Worldbuilding! How does this magic work? Is there a reason they couldn't have done this earlier? $\endgroup$ – Mithrandir24601 Jun 17 '18 at 20:24
  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to the site, Ami. Please note that the [tag:magic} tag requests you specify how magic functions in your world. As is, it is unclear how a device could be created to replicate "an organ in the brain." If you could clarify how this organ enables the use of magic, the community can attempt to identify a technological equivalent. As is, this is likely to be put on hold until a clarifying edit is made. $\endgroup$ – Frostfyre Jun 17 '18 at 22:18
  • $\begingroup$ May I recommend reading Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norell. It's very similar to what you're doing. $\endgroup$ – JBH Jun 17 '18 at 22:34
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yes.

for example a sealed lock that could only be opened by careful manipulation of the internal mechanisms, faster and less complex gun mechanisms that can be reloaded and triggered with the mind, some of the more finicky assemblies in industry would become easier or safe long range explosive detonation for mining all spring to mind quickly. there are many options to an inventive mind. as for aiding magic I imagine that high calorie sugar tonics (or injections) to provide the body the energy it needs to perform magic would be invented quickly. I imagine uses for such magic could be found long before the 1700's in truth.

more uses: agitating sealed chemical reactions, dredging items from the sea floor without diving, performing medical operations without invasive surgery (perhaps a keyhole to look through if necessary), the flip side of that (assassination by telekinetic throat crush), a primitive form of incandescent bulb heated by the mage, a compact piano that doesn't need the keys to be pressed with fingers so won't need all the keys arranged in a line, needleless sewing and handling hazardous materials like molten glass

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The industrial revolution would not necessarily make magic more useful in general, but the use of machinery from the industrial revolution would allow magic to better be used. The ability to operate machines or fix them from a greater range would allow for a smaller workforce in factories. Also, child labor would be used less, as in the textile industry, children were primarily used for reaching small places because their figures are smaller. Children would most likely have less control over their magic, and would be less useful in factories.

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No.

By your own wording, we meet one major obstacle: On present-Earth, the 18th century tech was the result of a long evolution of knowledge according to certain society models. You could say that every age is due for a certain invention.

You can't throw quantum leaps in a world that is not literally ready for them. It's like Bell came up with the iPhone first.

But if you throw in magic, then everything is possible, you set the rules, you don't need our opinion on how it could work.

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