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Can we produce Iodine element that is different from Iodine in salt? (The Iodine should be a new production and not made from separating other chemical compounds).

If we can produce this element, is it edible? And is this dangerous for our health?

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  • $\begingroup$ Do you mean simply elemental iodine? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iodine ? What do you mean by "different"? It really depends on what you mean by that word. You might also be interested in en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iodine-131 . $\endgroup$ – Raditz_35 May 31 '18 at 19:30
  • $\begingroup$ exactly no, in this page explain the iodine that find in nature, i want produce new one with that properties $\endgroup$ – Mohsen Saleh May 31 '18 at 19:35
  • $\begingroup$ Do you understand what an element is, and how it differs from a molecule? $\endgroup$ – o.m. May 31 '18 at 19:36
  • $\begingroup$ Where do you think the iodine you find in nature comes from? $\endgroup$ – Raditz_35 May 31 '18 at 19:37
  • $\begingroup$ iodine is in Potassium iodide or in sea plant and ... $\endgroup$ – Mohsen Saleh May 31 '18 at 19:39
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Atoms have no memory (despite opposite claims coming from certain pseudo sciences).

The water molecules you drink don't remember if they were in the ocean or in the septic tank before filling your glass.

Same holds for any other chemical: history doesn't matter.

The only way to produce new iodine which doesn't involve chemical reactions but actual nucleosynthesis is via nuclear reactions, either fusion or fission.

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  • $\begingroup$ Whether nuclear reactors are used in the world to produce iodine? $\endgroup$ – Mohsen Saleh May 31 '18 at 19:54
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    $\begingroup$ @MohsenSaleh They aren't. In theory they could, but it would be phenomenally expensive and probably not all that safe. $\endgroup$ – Cadence May 31 '18 at 19:58
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For starters, the iodine in salt is artificially added. It takes one of four typical forms: potassium iodide, sodium iodide, potassium iodate, and sodium iodate. It seems that humans can process elemental iodine just fine (unlike, say, nitrogen); presumably these four are chosen for having good physical properties for salt adding. It's also found in various foods: seafood and certain vegetables, chiefly.

Like many nonmetals, iodine is mainly found in the Earth's crust in the form of various compounds - sodium iodide is a major one. So you could in theory take that, grind it up, and put it in your salt and it would be just fine. (In practice, it's usually reduced to pure iodine first, so that we can be sure there aren't trace elements in it.) Iodines is iodines - once refined, its source is irrelevant.

In common with virtually every other important nutrient, too much iodine - whether in pure or salt form - can be hazardous or deadly. More than about 2 grams of pure iodine would be dangerous to a human.

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  • $\begingroup$ Sorry, rewrote my earlier comment, you actually figured out what the OP is asking I believe. +1 $\endgroup$ – Raditz_35 May 31 '18 at 19:49
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Atomic synthesis is possible at our current technological level, but incredibly, prohibitively expensive.

Iodine mining does not produce pure iodine, rather, the raw materials extracted are compound that primarily contain Iodine (such as Iodate) and will require chemical processing as a result.

The relative cost of producing pure iodine from atomic synthesis via fusion/fission is difficult to estimate, however, this Wikipedia article covers the process of synthesizing precious metals.

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"Natural" iodine is the isotope 127 of iodine.

You can produce, as a byproduct of some nuclear processes involving the fission of uranium, different isotopes that are chemically almost identical, but have different physical properties.

The most (in)famous is 131I, which decays to Xenon with a half-life of about eight days. 131I is a beta emitter, with a particularly nasty emission spectrum. Since iodine is essential for the function of the thyroid gland, it is readily absorbed by the organism and hoarded in the thyroid. Beta emission there will greatly increase the risk of a thyroid cancer.

This is why during fallouts from nuclear accidents where 131I contamination is suspected, people are given iodine supplements: to ensure that the organism gorges on 127I to the point that it won't pick up lethal 131I from the environment.

So: yes, it can be done, yes, it will be edible, and it will have carcinogenic effects depending on dose and exposure.

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