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We have a regular Earth as we know it, but instead of humans, there is this worm-like race, intelligent similarly as nowadays humans.
Their inner physiology is different from our worms (and not important for the question) but from outside they're the same as worms as we know them here on earth, but bigger (average length circa 150 centimetres).
That means no arms, no legs etc.

The question I really have is what machines would they built, but that is too broad and probably also opinion based.

So the question I REALLY ASK is if this race COULD build the same machines we currently have (in similar time) and especially I am thinking about COMPUTERS.

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    $\begingroup$ Some people might be confused by the term computer, but I'm not (technically blah). Anyhow, this question makes no sense. How long would it take the ancient Romans to build a car? it wouldn't even enter their mind to start such a project. we develop new ways of doing new things or doing the same things more efficiently. You can't compare species, especially if one is not humanoid, but the answer is that they could build any machine or whatever we can build, at the same time none of them and at the same time in a much better way. "similar time" is not a good way to compare this btw $\endgroup$ – Raditz_35 May 22 '18 at 11:42
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    $\begingroup$ Computers? They'd have struggled to make it to cave painting. Computers are very sophisticated tools, and the most basic of tools not only require a hand, but an opposable thumb.Even a stick dabbed in paint is probably beyond them, certainly to the point of doing anything grandly artistic. The fallacy demonstrated here is the underestimation of the role of the hand in the development of human ingenuity and technology. $\endgroup$ – Tim B II May 22 '18 at 11:46
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    $\begingroup$ @TimBII Imo that's highly debatable and made irrelevant given the premise "intelligent similarly as nowadays humans". I'm not going for a debate here, just letting the OP know that there are different opinions. I have no idea how an intelligent species would be possible without opposable thumbs, I honestly don't even know how anyone could know that for any species. We think it is highly unlikely, but we have 1 evidence to support this. This entire thumbs discussion is based on one example of intelligent life. If the question was "how", but one can be creative with this. Worms are flexible $\endgroup$ – Raditz_35 May 22 '18 at 11:50
  • $\begingroup$ Could intelligent worms build computers? Yes. Can we predict how intelligent worms might get there? No. Can we predict the time needed for their technological development? No. Those are elements that you, the storyteller, can set to meet the needs of your story. $\endgroup$ – user535733 May 22 '18 at 11:59
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    $\begingroup$ If you're interested in seeing a species of ant-like creatures invent parallel computing, as a source of inspiration, I recommend you look at Greg Egan's Incandescence. They don't build computers but part of the colony acts as a parallel computer. $\endgroup$ – Stephane May 22 '18 at 13:02
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If they are smart (worms on earth don't really need much brain power) they might build advanced water based computers using only tunnels and values, which probably is within the scope of worms. Further if they can use conductors they could possibly create electronics. These might be helpful in coordinating geo-engineering projects.

With patience and coordination groups of worms might be able to shape and manipulate things which is all you really need to start working on the long chain of making complicated tools.

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It seems that technology is developed because a species uses tools and can develop more complex tools. I've never heard of e.g. a snake using something as a tool (e.g. a stick).

In principle I suppose an intelligent species of snake- or worm-like creatures could have enough flexibility to grip objects and manipulate them, which is just about enough for basic tool use. From there, again, in principle, they could build better tools with the tools they have. As the late Douglas Adams would have said, humans are basically apes who figured out how to hit rocks together.

Two issues arise. 150 cm is small for a body that needs a brain large and complex enough to develop intelligence. I'd suggest larger is better. Also the question of communications as it does seem that developing the ability to communicate in a language (can be signed, movement based, color, anything) is required to develop sentience. Your species requires a need for social grouping to have a purpose for communication and develop a concept of shared effort and resources.

So the question I REALLY ASK is if this race COULD build the same machines we currently have (in similar time) and especially I am thinking about COMPUTERS.

Given the above they could develop computers (which is essentially down to having the idea and being able to build tools to do it), but they'd have a harder time as manipulating tools without something equivalent to hands (multiple appendages) is going to be more difficult. I'd suggest they "evolve" some kind of additional appendages (e.g. small tentacles).

Using any complex device without additional appendages would be very limiting. What would be the equivalent of a typewriter keyboard or a mouse for a race with only their body to manipulate things ?

Additional appendages are going to be needed.

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    $\begingroup$ This is such a complex issue and really an interesting debate, especially for people that come up with truly alien races. While I think that you could fill an evening of discussions with this topic or perhaps even an entire library, I think there is one very, very important point that you need to address in your answer: You say worms (whatever) don't use tools, but some animals do and somehow that's important. Well, I know why the animals use rocks to e.g. open nuts, what would a worm need a tool for? If you can answer that question, we can see if some worm could handle any version of it $\endgroup$ – Raditz_35 May 22 '18 at 12:24
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    $\begingroup$ Worms as we know them don't need tools, but worms in this scenario may find a tool (e.g. a lever to move a rock) useful for getting at food or something like that. I don't see a particular issue with the need for tools - a writer can always find something. $\endgroup$ – StephenG May 22 '18 at 12:36
  • $\begingroup$ I'm not so sure that worms that we know don't use tools even. Take this for example, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sabellariidae . They build stuff, well, maybe they don't smash rocks together, but so they glue sand together, that's small rocks and they even keep together, I honestly don't see a big difference. $\endgroup$ – Raditz_35 May 22 '18 at 12:43
  • $\begingroup$ @Raditz_35 I'm no expert on worms, so feel free to suggest that. I guess making a home could be considered tool making. $\endgroup$ – StephenG May 22 '18 at 13:05
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    $\begingroup$ I think this touches on the most important point: computers are a tool, made using simpler tools. As long as the species can make some tools out of natural objects, and then start a cycle of "use current tools to make better tools" it's probably believable that something of similar complexity and purpose as computers would come about eventually. $\endgroup$ – Kamil Drakari May 22 '18 at 17:36
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Yes.

Building complex machines-- or even simple machines, really-- takes not only intelligence, but the physical capacity to assemble them. However, this may not be as big of a problem as it seems at first. Humans with no functioning arms or legs can do a surprising number of tasks (Stephen Hawking could move and write books, comedians like Nick Vujicic give speeches, some can even drive cars). Of course, that's with the assistance of machines that were built by lots of other people's fingers and thumbs, but it can be done.

The way I see it, an intelligent worm would have two ways of manipulating objects: by mouth and by tail, assuming their tail is prehensile. (Even if it wasn't always, it likely would have evolved to be.) With these, several worms working together could assemble some fairly complex gadgets, which could then be used to assemble even more complex gadgets, and so on. By themselves, worms would not have the fine motor skills to assemble a computer-- but then again, if we're talking about today's computers, neither do we. The components of a modern motherboard are much too small for human hands, and are built by machines. It may take your worms a lot longer to reach that point, but I think it's conceivable that eventually they could.

So what would worm tools look like? Tail-attachments and mouth assemblies.

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The main problem I see is that one of the reasons (not the only one, of course) we evolved so much was our opposable thumbs that made easier for us to grab things and develop tools. With giant worms, you need to be highly creative to think how did/do they use/create those tools. Some ideas: Maybe their mouths are really useful and act like our hands. Or they can manipulate threads... and get really good at playing with the yoyo.

Once the basic tools are created, I'm sure they could develope something similar to a computer with the time.

We started developing faster and faster when we created methods to preserve our findings and accumulate knowledge (history started with writting for a reason). Another thing that seems important in our evolution is that we live "long" lifes and get the chance to pass our knowledge to the future generations. Some scientists have theorized that octupuses could be as developed as us if their lifes were longer (their tentacles are really useful and they are highly intelligent).

Conclusion: really difficult but I wouldn't say imposible.

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If they can figure out how to make a screw driver, they can probably get the rest of the way to a computer. Perhaps they can hold one thing in their mouth and another in their anus. Instead of chairs, they could wrap themselves around a cleat to gain purchase.

Humans are arguably intelligent and definitely worm-like - and we managed.

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If they can build a given machine, as in have the resources for it, and they have a use for it, it makes some part of their lives easier or makes possible useful processes not previously available then they will. A single worm has a suction grip called a mouth and can use it's body, when partly buried, as a very strong anchour to support effort, what they don't have is much body rigidity, this limits the relative weights they can move without mechanical assistance in the form of levers and/or ramps. So really the question is what technologies and machines does a worm have use for? And the answer is; sod all. There just aren't many things that can make a worm's life any easier, cutting tools to help break down organic matter for food, something in a shovel arrangement for boring tunnels quicker and easier. That's about it and those can be made in stone and there's no reason to make them in anything else.

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None. The only reason we have tools of any kind is because we have opposable thumbs.
If you can't grab a rock or a stick you never use it and never wonder how to make usage of it better. Stronger, faster. If you don't have the technology you invent it.

And because they wouldn't have need for tools (or even idea of tool) they would not create any technology. In the end computers were made only to throw rock at longer distance with better accuracy. and why would you need to throw anything if you get all your nutrients from munching on soil?

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    $\begingroup$ Some worms use stone tools, as in single stones as tools to waterproof their tunnels. It's not sophisticated but it is tool use. Opposable thumbs are not an absolute requirement just some gripping appendage. $\endgroup$ – Ash May 22 '18 at 13:10
  • $\begingroup$ Really? Worm having enough intelligence to recognise and use waterproof materials? $\endgroup$ – SZCZERZO KŁY May 22 '18 at 13:32
  • $\begingroup$ Some species do, they pull pebbles into place over their burrows in the evening when it's rainy. $\endgroup$ – Ash May 22 '18 at 13:35
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    $\begingroup$ @SZCZERZOKŁY, You don't need to bring in intelligence to explain that kind of behavior. Instinct is enough. Lots of critters instinctively perform tasks that are way more complex than pushing/pulling a pebble into a tunnel. $\endgroup$ – Solomon Slow May 22 '18 at 18:08

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