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How can you determine how bright a gas giant would be, especially if it has inhabited moons with an Earth-like atmosphere?

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    $\begingroup$ I cannot see the relationship between the existence of satellites and the albedo of the primary -- you may want to explain why you believe there is such a relationship. Anyway, in our solar system gas giants have albedos between 40% (Neptune) and 50% (Jupiter, Uranus and Saturn); from the point of view of a satellite, the gas giant primary is a very large and very bright object in the sky. $\endgroup$ – AlexP Apr 10 '18 at 8:22
  • $\begingroup$ It depends. What is the gas giant's composition, average temperature, mass, and how far away is it from its parent star? $\endgroup$ – Renan Apr 10 '18 at 12:14
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I found a good resource here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YRzJdg13geU&list=PLIIOUpOge0LuGoV8698AWjDcMYeB9OvEf&index=3 but basically that would depend on distance from the sun and orbit of the moon. Due to tidal heat and reflected light from planet such gaia moon would be further from the sun. With low orbit of something like 24 hours it could provide similar amount of light as sun. About 20000 more than moon but orbit that close would be inside radiation zone of giant. The further you go this will go down. Mind you that closer will cause planet side of the moon to be much warmer and further will make a day to last for several earth days both will have huge impact on ecology and climate (tidal winds).

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