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My fictional worlds reside in a multiverse. More specifically, they reside in a universe within that multiverse that is very similar to ours.

But here are some big differences:

  1. White holes are in equilibrium with black holes enter image description here

This is the complete penrose diagram for an eternal black hole with 0 charge or rotation. It doesn't quite describe what I mean by white holes in equilibrium with black holes because it is across time, not space.

But for every black hole in the multiverse, there is a white hole it is connected to via the singularity. This means there must be negative gravity in the white hole. Or in Einsteinian terms, space-time curvature must be negative in the white hole. This means the white hole has the negative of the mass of the black hole.

But just because the multiverse has this equilibrium does not mean that a given universe will also have this equilibrium. Some have more black holes, some have more white holes, some have equal numbers, and sometimes the white hole forms a totally new universe.

In this case, black holes would correspond to dark matter and white holes to dark energy in the sense that white holes cause expansion and the more white holes, the faster it expands. Black holes due to general relativity would slow down this expansion.

  1. All universes are cyclic enter image description here

White holes forming new universes implies that every universe within the multiverse must be cyclic. In other words, every universe must collapse to infinite density via gravity. This requires that there is dark matter and dark energy and more specifically that dark matter must be synthesized in some way.

Maybe virtual particles having a chance to turn into gravitons(gravity carrying particles) and that chance being way higher in areas of dark matter. This way, an observer would notice an increase in dark matter and thus gravity. More dark matter = higher chance of graviton formation = even more gravity -> gravitational collapse of universe -> Another big bang.

This means that there must be quantum spacetime.

But with these white holes and cyclic universes as I have written, what physical laws would need to be different from those of our universe and how? Would there need to be a quantum relativity?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by L.Dutch, RonJohn, Aify, JBH, Andon Apr 3 '18 at 7:31

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ You are asking to speculate on physical laws needed in an already speculative universe with white holes, which are again speculative objects? I have an hard time in not seeing this as primarily opinion based. $\endgroup$ – L.Dutch Apr 3 '18 at 4:46
  • $\begingroup$ Well I tried asking this on Physics SE and they said that this is more suited for Worldbuilding SE, even though it is about physics. $\endgroup$ – Caters Apr 3 '18 at 4:53
  • $\begingroup$ Well... it isn't about physics. It's about fiction, and that's the problem. You're asking (both they and we) to account for actual physical laws based on a wholly fictional construct. That's primarily opinion-based, meaning your guess is as good as anyone else's and there's no way to justify one-best-answer other than by popular vote, which isn't how Stack Exchange sites work. $\endgroup$ – JBH Apr 3 '18 at 5:30
  • $\begingroup$ The second law of thermodynamics probably wouldn't apply. Extrapolate from there... $\endgroup$ – nzaman Apr 3 '18 at 11:50