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Satyrs are creatures from Greek mythology said to resemble a human with the ears, horns and lower half of a goat. They are known for throwing wild parties, heavily drinking and a fondness for music. Could something like this evolve in nature?

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    $\begingroup$ This is fit for the anatomically correct series. $\endgroup$ Apr 2, 2018 at 18:00
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    $\begingroup$ They are known for "throwing wild parties, heavily drinking and a fondness for music"... and, of course, first and foremost for their unbounded sexual appetite; their most common representation is with an erect penis. In ancient art satyrs are shown with human feet more often than with caprine hoofs. (But, yes, the oldest representations are much more animalic than newer representations.) $\endgroup$
    – AlexP
    Apr 2, 2018 at 18:31
  • $\begingroup$ Satyrs were originally depicted as like a horse rather than like a goat $\endgroup$ Jul 12, 2020 at 21:05

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100% of known sapient life came from opportunistic omnivorous scavengers that could be considered invasive species, so you've got that going for you. Considering all wild goat species are mountain-dwellers (where quadripedal is king), it might be a wise move to evolve them from a domesticated breed so they'd have a better chance of bipedality.

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