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Due to Neptune's high concentration of methane which is highly combustible, could it be ignited if you found a way to keep a continuous flame.This question is asked in the scope of figuring out if human settlement of Neptune would cause this. Would it explode if this flame was set for more than thirty min?

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    $\begingroup$ No, because there is no oxygen (or other oxidant) there. $\endgroup$ – Alexander Mar 27 '18 at 22:21
  • $\begingroup$ The answer is in Alexander's comment. The question is about the real world and not about building a world, and is more appropriate for physics.SE....or something. Its really not a great fit anywhere, but fortunately, it has been answered. Voting to close as off-topic. $\endgroup$ – kingledion Mar 27 '18 at 22:33
  • $\begingroup$ Note that Neptune has no solid surface we could place a colony on. I do not think any there is any practical way to get around this without enormous problems. $\endgroup$ – StephenG Mar 28 '18 at 0:45
  • $\begingroup$ sorry guys... sniff $\endgroup$ – Efialtes Mar 28 '18 at 0:52
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    $\begingroup$ I would post this as an answer, but it has been put on hold: The planet not, but perhaps the colony. If you have a bunch of highly pressurized hydrogen around you, it will get into your colony. There is no such thing as hydrogen proof material as it is soluble in solids and will diffuse through. A significant amount of hydrogen should leak into your base if you build it naively and if you light a fire (for example), it will have some consequences. $\endgroup$ – Raditz_35 Mar 28 '18 at 7:47
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No.

Short answer: there's no oxygen

Longer answer: as a rule, potential chemical reactions don't really hang around in the natural world unless living things are present. Most things that would react have reacted; Earth is of course the exception in this regard.

Fire requires oxygen - a highly-reactive substance, which only exists in its free form due to organisms which produce it as a waste product.

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This would be dependent on two factors: the availability of oxidant (that does not seem to be enough on the planet anyways) and the distribution of both the gases such that there are not pockets of gases that would combust and leave the rest of the planet unaltered.

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