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One day, a few months ago, I read a post, some one guy talking about a hamster world domination. It was weird but interesting. The post has not especifications, but still, It is funny and interesting how the hell hamsters dominated the world. Anyway, I was thinking about how that could have happened, and the following occurred to me:

1.- First, an overpopulation: Hamsters can reproduce at an early age and usually have numerous offspring. It is not necessary to imagine a complex and difficult scenario for this to happen, just look at the rats, which are basically a plague and are close relatives from hamsters 2.-Second, diseases: Hamsters can directly transmit diseases such as choriomeningitis, among others, and can indirectly transmit Black death. And let's not forget that they can also transmit diseases through their urine or excrement, contaminating and making the earth and other animals sick.

All this combined could make hamsters the new dominant species, and if there is no extreme change in the next thousands of years, they would evolve into humanoids except that they would be rodents instead of primates.

Finally, the post, asked the question about the problem of drinking water, so in a process of thousands of years, the water should have recovered a large part of its purity it would only be a matter of time to see if the evolved hamsters make our mistakes or have a better awareness of their environment.

So, what is your opinion, I would like to know if it is really possible, or if there is something I omitted.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by sphennings, L.Dutch, JBH, Andon, rek Jan 21 '18 at 4:19

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) are prey. Lots of hamsters means lots of happy foxes and owls, and much fewer hamsters. And by the way, in the wild hamsters are not doing so well; they are now on the list of vulnerable species. Racoons on the other hand... $\endgroup$ – AlexP Jan 20 '18 at 20:09
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    $\begingroup$ @AlexP is pointing out an important point: how hamsters can defend themselves. As written, this question is broad (is there something I omitted) and primarily opinion-based (is this possible?). To avoid closure, you should ask specific, unambiguous questions like, "how would a species of intelligent hamsters defend themselves against natural predators?" $\endgroup$ – JBH Jan 20 '18 at 21:21
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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Worldbuilding! As an alternative to the suggestion pointed out by @JBH above, this could also be constrained further into a reality-check question, asking if a (specific) concept if possible given some context $\endgroup$ – Mithrandir24601 Jan 20 '18 at 22:02
  • $\begingroup$ Reminded me of Re:Hamster, a web-novel. Sometimes funny, sometimes disturbing. $\endgroup$ – Necessity Jan 20 '18 at 23:08
  • $\begingroup$ Are you sure they aren't in charge already? youtu.be/miC1VZ9UVCQ $\endgroup$ – Spencer Jan 21 '18 at 2:06
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First, an overpopulation: Hamsters can reproduce ...

All this combined could make hamsters the new dominant species,

Numbers and the ability to transmit disease do not make you dominant.

We're dominant and all we have is our smarts. Well, not all presidents, but some of us. Smart wins if you have moderate numbers and are not near extinction or over-hunted. The only species likely to kill us is us. ( Maybe we should wipe ourselves out to deter future aggression. :-) )

Hamsters are not exactly a threat to our position in this sense. Not like Emus - I can't warn people enough about Emus. :-)

and if there is no extreme change in the next thousands of years, they would evolve into humanoids except that they would be rodents instead of primates.

There is no reason to think anything could evolve that quickly.

Human's evolved from a long and distinguished ancestory but the time to get from something like hamster-equivalent to good-old Homo Sapien was of the order of 30 million years.

So by the time hamsters make it to vaguely humanoid and smart enough to be a threat, we'll either have figured out how to get off the rock we're stuck on now or blown it to bits experimenting too hard. And if by some chance we're still stuck here in 30 million years, some hamster still trying to figure out how to make fire is not going to form any kind of threat to us.

Slightly more seriously, they're not going to figure out how to poison us soon enough to prevent us have developed medical science to the point that such things will be irrelevant. I mean, 30 million years, they might even figure out how to agree a budget in that time scale.

So, no, do not fear the hamsters.

But I agree with @AlexP : Raccoons are smart enough already and having seen one rip a metal bin apart easier than a fully equipped infantry soldier would, I am inclined to think that, if they join up with the aforementioned Emus, we're dead ducks. Yep, Emu riding Raccoons - the next terror wave. :-)

Finally, the post, asked the question about the problem of drinking water, so in a process of thousands of years,

That's "Millions of Years" !

the water should have recovered a large part of its purity it would only be a matter of time to see if the evolved hamsters make our mistakes or have a better awareness of their environment.

I think once they discover pizza in cardboard boxes delivered by car or moped no society can be expected to avoid it's own destruction. After all, how can anyone resist Pepperoni Pizza ? So they are doomed, just as we are, unless some clever hamster invents proper microwaveable pizza (or something better than a microwave).

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