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First off space is full of hard radiation anyway so a space station that you're going to inhabit for any length of time at a stretch has to be a radiation bunker anyway, especially if it's outside a planetary magnetic field. That's the simplest answer; ships and stations are going to get hit with a LOT of radiation all the time so shielding isn't the issue you seem to think it is. 

But to address the question anyway 1. start with traffic control, ships may not fire their main drives on a particular set of vectors within this area on pain of really stiff fines, this creates a series of "approach corridors" (actually cones) where radiation emission is legal and shields the station and any docked ships from an extra dose 2. still a traffic control measure really, require ships to leave their drive modules parked at a point of closest approach and use docking tugs 3. more traffic control, ships don't really need to get all that close to a station anyway, send out cargo tenders and supply vessels that have a shorter range and heavier payload to resupply the "docked" vessels and exchange cargo pods without long-range high-emission ships coming too close to the station.

All of which ignores the fact that the real answer is in fact you can't. If someone decides to use the particles or radiation from a reaction engine as a weapon there is nothing you can do about it, by the time you can see that they have turned their exhaust on you they're already pumping out hard radiation in your direction and depending how far away they are they've been doing so for quite some time. Always remember that at seventh and last a space ship is a weapon in the wrong hands, and with a reaction drive you don't even need to hit someone with the ship directly.

First off space is full of hard radiation anyway so a space station that you're going to inhabit for any length of time at a stretch has to be a radiation bunker anyway, especially if it's outside a planetary magnetic field. That's the simplest answer; ships and stations are going to get hit with a LOT of radiation all the time so shielding isn't the issue you seem to think it is. But to address the question anyway 1. start with traffic control, ships may not fire their main drives on a particular set of vectors within this area on pain of really stiff fines, this creates a series of "approach corridors" (actually cones) where radiation emission is legal and shields the station and any docked ships from an extra dose 2. still a traffic control measure really, require ships to leave their drive modules parked at a point of closest approach and use docking tugs 3. more traffic control, ships don't really need to get all that close to a station anyway, send out cargo tenders and supply vessels that have a shorter range and heavier payload to resupply the "docked" vessels and exchange cargo pods without long-range high-emission ships coming too close to the station.

All of which ignores the fact that the real answer is in fact you can't. If someone decides to use the particles or radiation from a reaction engine as a weapon there is nothing you can do about it, by the time you can see that they have turned their exhaust on you they're already pumping out hard radiation in your direction and depending how far away they are they've been doing so for quite some time. Always remember that at seventh and last a space ship is a weapon in the wrong hands, and with a reaction drive you don't even need to hit someone with the ship directly.

First off space is full of hard radiation anyway so a space station that you're going to inhabit for any length of time at a stretch has to be a radiation bunker, especially if it's outside a planetary magnetic field. That's the simplest answer; ships and stations are going to get hit with a LOT of radiation all the time so shielding isn't the issue you seem to think it is. 

But to address the question anyway 1. start with traffic control, ships may not fire their main drives on a particular set of vectors within this area on pain of really stiff fines, this creates a series of "approach corridors" (actually cones) where radiation emission is legal and shields the station and any docked ships from an extra dose 2. still a traffic control measure really, require ships to leave their drive modules parked at a point of closest approach and use docking tugs 3. more traffic control, ships don't really need to get all that close to a station anyway, send out cargo tenders and supply vessels that have a shorter range and heavier payload to resupply the "docked" vessels and exchange cargo pods without long-range high-emission ships coming too close to the station.

All of which ignores the fact that the real answer is in fact you can't. If someone decides to use the particles or radiation from a reaction engine as a weapon there is nothing you can do about it, by the time you can see that they have turned their exhaust on you they're already pumping out hard radiation in your direction and depending how far away they are they've been doing so for quite some time. Always remember that at seventh and last a space ship is a weapon in the wrong hands, and with a reaction drive you don't even need to hit someone with the ship directly.

2 Spelling and grammer fixes.
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First off space is full of hard radiation anyway so a space station that you're going to inhabit for any length of time at a stretch has to be a radiation bunker anyway, especially if it's outside a planetary magnetic field. That's the simplest answer; ships and stations are going to get hit with a LOT of radiation all the time so shielding isn't the issue you seem to think it is. But to address the question anyway 1. start with traffic control, ships may not fire their main drives on a particular set of vectors within this area on pain of really stiff fines, this creates a series of "approach corridors" (actually cones) where radiation emission is legal and shields the station and any docked ships from an extra dose 2. still a traffic control measure really, require ships to leave their drive modules parked at a point of closest approach and use docking tugs 3. more traffic control, ships don't really need to get all that close to a station anyway, send out cargo tenders and supply vessels that have a shorter range and heavier payload to resupply the "docked" vessels and exchange cargo pods without long-range high-emission ships coming in too close to the station.

All of which ignores the fact that the real answer is in fact you can't. If someone decides to use the particles or radiation from a reaction engine as a weapon there is nothing you can do about it because, by the time you can see that they have done soturned their exhaust on you they're already pumping out hard radiation in youyour direction and depending how far away they are they've been doing so for quite some time. Always remember that at seventh and last a space ship is a weapon in the wrong hands, and with a reaction drive you don't even need to hit someone with itthe ship directly.

First off space is full of hard radiation anyway a space station that you're going to inhabit for any length of time at a stretch has to be a radiation bunker anyway, especially if it's outside a planetary magnetic field. That's the simplest answer; ships and stations are going to get hit with a LOT of radiation all the time so shielding isn't the issue you seem to think it is. But to address the question anyway 1. start with traffic control, ships may not fire their main drives on a particular set of vectors within this area on pain of really stiff fines, this creates a series of "approach corridors" (actually cones) where radiation emission is legal and shields the station and any docked ships from an extra dose 2. still a traffic control measure really, require ships to leave their drive modules parked at a point of closest approach and use docking tugs 3. more traffic control, ships don't really need to get all that close to a station anyway, send out cargo tenders and supply vessels that have a shorter range and heavier payload to resupply the "docked" vessels and exchange cargo pods without long-range high-emission ships coming in too close to the station.

All of which ignores the fact that the real answer is you can't. If someone decides to use the radiation from a reaction engine as a weapon there is nothing you can do about it because by the time you can see that they have done so they're already pumping out hard radiation in you direction and depending how far away they are they've been doing so for some time. Always remember that at seventh and last a space ship is a weapon in the wrong hands and with a reaction drive you don't even need to hit someone with it directly.

First off space is full of hard radiation anyway so a space station that you're going to inhabit for any length of time at a stretch has to be a radiation bunker anyway, especially if it's outside a planetary magnetic field. That's the simplest answer; ships and stations are going to get hit with a LOT of radiation all the time so shielding isn't the issue you seem to think it is. But to address the question anyway 1. start with traffic control, ships may not fire their main drives on a particular set of vectors within this area on pain of really stiff fines, this creates a series of "approach corridors" (actually cones) where radiation emission is legal and shields the station and any docked ships from an extra dose 2. still a traffic control measure really, require ships to leave their drive modules parked at a point of closest approach and use docking tugs 3. more traffic control, ships don't really need to get all that close to a station anyway, send out cargo tenders and supply vessels that have a shorter range and heavier payload to resupply the "docked" vessels and exchange cargo pods without long-range high-emission ships coming too close to the station.

All of which ignores the fact that the real answer is in fact you can't. If someone decides to use the particles or radiation from a reaction engine as a weapon there is nothing you can do about it, by the time you can see that they have turned their exhaust on you they're already pumping out hard radiation in your direction and depending how far away they are they've been doing so for quite some time. Always remember that at seventh and last a space ship is a weapon in the wrong hands, and with a reaction drive you don't even need to hit someone with the ship directly.

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First off space is full of hard radiation anyway a space station that you're going to inhabit for any length of time at a stretch has to be a radiation bunker anyway, especially if it's outside a planetary magnetic field. That's the simplest answer; ships and stations are going to get hit with a LOT of radiation all the time so shielding isn't the issue you seem to think it is. But to address the question anyway 1. start with traffic control, ships may not fire their main drives on a particular set of vectors within this area on pain of really stiff fines, this creates a series of "approach corridors" (actually cones) where radiation emission is legal and shields the station and any docked ships from an extra dose 2. still a traffic control measure really, require ships to leave their drive modules parked at a point of closest approach and use docking tugs 3. more traffic control, ships don't really need to get all that close to a station anyway, send out cargo tenders and supply vessels that have a shorter range and heavier payload to resupply the "docked" vessels and exchange cargo pods without long-range high-emission ships coming in too close to the station.

All of which ignores the fact that the real answer is you can't. If someone decides to use the radiation from a reaction engine as a weapon there is nothing you can do about it because by the time you can see that they have done so they're already pumping out hard radiation in you direction and depending how far away they are they've been doing so for some time. Always remember that at seventh and last a space ship is a weapon in the wrong hands and with a reaction drive you don't even need to hit someone with it directly.