3 added 287 characters in body
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Yes. If you lay the ground for them.

more World of Warcraft than Game of Thrones

Okay, that's a start.

Now, it's a mediaeval-ish period, but there are nuclear weapons in the first place. Either these came from "outside" (e.g. from another planet where there was a higher level of technology) or from a more technologically advanced period (or both, as per Sheri S Tepper's True Game series).

In a mediaeval-ish period it's perfectly sensible to have a belief in processes that can turn one element (as we understand the term today) into another. This belief is chrysopoeia which was described at least as far back as the classical period, grew in the mediaeval period and through to the early modern period as an essential part of the alchemical Great Work and is still believed in today by some with varying degrees of how much they hold it is literal or symbolic of spiritual change on the one hand and how much they hold it agrees or is unconnected to the current understanding of atomic decay, fission and fusion.

Alchemists used a great many strange symbols, some of which survive today with different purposes (e.g. ♀, ♂ and ☿ used in biology were originally used by alchemists as well as astrologers). Modern physics and its related technologies have many strange symbols (try to consider seeing ☢ if you had no knowledge of modern science).

An alchemy of a re-mediaeval period—that is, a future period in which technology has ended up at a level similar to that of the mediaeval period—that also worked would likely at least partially retain knowledge from our more technologically advanced time.

At first glance (or first description to the reader) it would be much like mediaeval alchemy in combining some genuine understanding of the facts covered by natural sciences, a relatively poor understanding of the scientific method, and a bunch of weird symbols and legends of devices with great power that could transmutate metals. It could though retain enough information of the past for a device to be recognised as one that was in elder times dropped from powerful flying machines and through impure and perverted chrysopoeia bringing a rain of brimstone that felled cities far greater than any known today and a scourge of wormwood that poisoned all the peoples and the beasts in the field for miles around, salting the earth so that even crops could not grow there for many generations.

As such you could:

  1. Have a period that was reasonably close to mediaeval.
  2. Have nuclear weapons, lying dormant.
  3. Have the characters within the story recognisedrecognise them as incredibly destructive things.
  4. Have the reader/audience recognisedrecognise them as nuclear weapons.
  5. Disassembling the device to the point of guaranteeing fatal exposure to all present isn't necessary. (Not least since the idea that its a good idea to try tasting a chemical you think is likely not poisonous and the idea that metals are never poisonous both died out in chemistry more recently than you might think, and so could have returned as investigative procedures for an alchemist).

Yes. If you lay the ground for them.

more World of Warcraft than Game of Thrones

Okay, that's a start.

Now, it's a mediaeval-ish period, but there are nuclear weapons in the first place. Either these came from "outside" (e.g. from another planet where there was a higher level of technology) or from a more technologically advanced period (or both, as per Sheri S Tepper's True Game series).

In a mediaeval-ish period it's perfectly sensible to have a belief in processes that can turn one element (as we understand the term today) into another. This belief is chrysopoeia which was described at least as far back as the classical period, grew in the mediaeval period and through to the early modern period as an essential part of the alchemical Great Work and is still believed in today by some with varying degrees of how much they hold it is literal or symbolic of spiritual change on the one hand and how much they hold it agrees or is unconnected to the current understanding of atomic decay, fission and fusion.

Alchemists used a great many strange symbols, some of which survive today with different purposes (e.g. ♀, ♂ and ☿ used in biology were originally used by alchemists as well as astrologers). Modern physics and its related technologies have many strange symbols (try to consider seeing ☢ if you had no knowledge of modern science).

An alchemy of a re-mediaeval period—that is, a future period in which technology has ended up at a level similar to that of the mediaeval period—that also worked would likely at least partially retain knowledge from our more technologically advanced time.

At first glance (or first description to the reader) it would be much like mediaeval alchemy in combining some genuine understanding of the facts covered by natural sciences, a relatively poor understanding of the scientific method, and a bunch of weird symbols and legends of devices with great power that could transmutate metals. It could though retain enough information of the past for a device to be recognised as one that was in elder times dropped from powerful flying machines and through impure and perverted chrysopoeia bringing a rain of brimstone that felled cities far greater than any known today and a scourge of wormwood that poisoned all the peoples and the beasts in the field for miles around, salting the earth so that even crops could not grow there for many generations.

As such you could:

  1. Have a period that was reasonably close to mediaeval.
  2. Have nuclear weapons, lying dormant.
  3. Have the characters within the story recognised them as incredibly destructive things.
  4. Have the reader/audience recognised them as nuclear weapons.
  5. Disassembling the device to the point of guaranteeing fatal exposure to all present isn't necessary.

Yes. If you lay the ground for them.

more World of Warcraft than Game of Thrones

Okay, that's a start.

Now, it's a mediaeval-ish period, but there are nuclear weapons in the first place. Either these came from "outside" (e.g. from another planet where there was a higher level of technology) or from a more technologically advanced period (or both, as per Sheri S Tepper's True Game series).

In a mediaeval-ish period it's perfectly sensible to have a belief in processes that can turn one element (as we understand the term today) into another. This belief is chrysopoeia which was described at least as far back as the classical period, grew in the mediaeval period and through to the early modern period as an essential part of the alchemical Great Work and is still believed in today by some with varying degrees of how much they hold it is literal or symbolic of spiritual change on the one hand and how much they hold it agrees or is unconnected to the current understanding of atomic decay, fission and fusion.

Alchemists used a great many strange symbols, some of which survive today with different purposes (e.g. ♀, ♂ and ☿ used in biology were originally used by alchemists as well as astrologers). Modern physics and its related technologies have many strange symbols (try to consider seeing ☢ if you had no knowledge of modern science).

An alchemy of a re-mediaeval period—that is, a future period in which technology has ended up at a level similar to that of the mediaeval period—that also worked would likely at least partially retain knowledge from our more technologically advanced time.

At first glance (or first description to the reader) it would be much like mediaeval alchemy in combining some genuine understanding of the facts covered by natural sciences, a relatively poor understanding of the scientific method, and a bunch of weird symbols and legends of devices with great power that could transmutate metals. It could though retain enough information of the past for a device to be recognised as one that was in elder times dropped from powerful flying machines and through impure and perverted chrysopoeia bringing a rain of brimstone that felled cities far greater than any known today and a scourge of wormwood that poisoned all the peoples and the beasts in the field for miles around, salting the earth so that even crops could not grow there for many generations.

As such you could:

  1. Have a period that was reasonably close to mediaeval.
  2. Have nuclear weapons, lying dormant.
  3. Have the characters within the story recognise them as incredibly destructive things.
  4. Have the reader/audience recognise them as nuclear weapons.
  5. Disassembling the device to the point of guaranteeing fatal exposure to all present isn't necessary. (Not least since the idea that its a good idea to try tasting a chemical you think is likely not poisonous and the idea that metals are never poisonous both died out in chemistry more recently than you might think, and so could have returned as investigative procedures for an alchemist).
2 added 105 characters in body
source | link

Yes. If you lay the ground for them.

more World of Warcraft than Game of Thrones

Okay, that's a start.

Now, it's a mediaeval-ish period, but there are nuclear weapons in the first place. Either these came from "outside" (e.g. from another planet where there was a higher level of technology) or from a more technologically advanced period (or both, as per Sheri S Tepper's True Game series).

In a mediaeval-ish period it's perfectly sensible to have a belief in processes that can turn one element (as we understand the term today) into another. This belief is chrysopoeia which was described at least as far back as the classical period, grew in the mediaeval period and through to the early modern period as an essential part of the alchemical Great Work and is still believed in today by some with varying degrees of how much they hold it is literal or symbolic of spiritual change on the one hand and how much they hold it agrees or is unconnected to the current understanding of atomic decay, fission and fusion.

Alchemists used a great many strange symbols, some of which survive today with different purposes (e.g. ♀, ♂ and ☿ used in biology were originally used by alchemists as well as astrologers). Modern physics and its related technologies have many strange symbols (try to consider seeing ☢ if you had no knowledge of modern science).

An alchemy of a re-mediaeval period—that is, a future period in which technology has ended up at a level similar to that of the mediaeval period—that also worked would likely at least partially retain knowledge from our more technologically advanced time.

At first glance (or first description to the reader) it would be much like mediaeval alchemy in combining some genuine understanding of the facts covered by natural sciences, a relatively poor understanding of the scientific method, and a bunch of weird symbols and legends of devices with great power that could transmutate metals. It could though retain enough information of the past for a device to be recognised as one that was in elder times dropped from powerful flying machines and through impure and perverted chrysopoeia bringing a rain of brimstone that felled cities far greater than any known today and a scourge of wormwood that poisoned all the peoples and the beasts in the field for miles around, salting the earth so that even crops could not grow there for many generations.

As such you could:

  1. Have a period that was reasonably close to mediaeval.
  2. Have nuclear weapons, lying dormant.
  3. Have the characters within the story recognised them as incredibly destructive things.
  4. Have the reader/audience recognised them as nuclear weapons.
  5. Disassembling the device to the point of guaranteeing fatal exposure to all present isn't necessary.

Yes. If you lay the ground for them.

more World of Warcraft than Game of Thrones

Okay, that's a start.

Now, it's a mediaeval-ish period, but there are nuclear weapons in the first place. Either these came from "outside" (e.g. from another planet where there was a higher level of technology) or from a more technologically advanced period (or both, as per Sheri S Tepper's True Game series).

In a mediaeval-ish period it's perfectly sensible to have a belief in processes that can turn one element (as we understand the term today) into another. This belief is chrysopoeia which was described at least as far back as the classical period, grew in the mediaeval period and through to the early modern period as an essential part of the alchemical Great Work and is still believed in today by some with varying degrees of how much they hold it is literal or symbolic of spiritual change on the one hand and how much they hold it agrees or is unconnected to the current understanding of atomic decay, fission and fusion.

Alchemists used a great many strange symbols, some of which survive today with different purposes (e.g. ♀, ♂ and ☿ used in biology were originally used by alchemists as well as astrologers). Modern physics and its related technologies have many strange symbols (try to consider seeing ☢ if you had no knowledge of modern science).

An alchemy of a re-mediaeval period—that is, a future period in which technology has ended up at a level similar to that of the mediaeval period—that also worked would likely at least partially retain knowledge from our more technologically advanced time.

At first glance (or first description to the reader) it would be much like mediaeval alchemy in combining some genuine understanding of the facts covered by natural sciences, a relatively poor understanding of the scientific method, and a bunch of weird symbols and legends of devices with great power that could transmutate metals. It could though retain enough information of the past for a device to be recognised as one that was in elder times dropped from powerful flying machines and through impure and perverted chrysopoeia bringing a rain of brimstone that felled cities far greater than any known today and a scourge of wormwood that poisoned all the peoples and the beasts in the field for miles around, salting the earth so that even crops could not grow there for many generations.

As such you could:

  1. Have a period that was reasonably close to mediaeval.
  2. Have nuclear weapons, lying dormant.
  3. Have the characters within the story recognised them as incredibly destructive things.
  4. Have the reader/audience recognised them as nuclear weapons.

Yes. If you lay the ground for them.

more World of Warcraft than Game of Thrones

Okay, that's a start.

Now, it's a mediaeval-ish period, but there are nuclear weapons in the first place. Either these came from "outside" (e.g. from another planet where there was a higher level of technology) or from a more technologically advanced period (or both, as per Sheri S Tepper's True Game series).

In a mediaeval-ish period it's perfectly sensible to have a belief in processes that can turn one element (as we understand the term today) into another. This belief is chrysopoeia which was described at least as far back as the classical period, grew in the mediaeval period and through to the early modern period as an essential part of the alchemical Great Work and is still believed in today by some with varying degrees of how much they hold it is literal or symbolic of spiritual change on the one hand and how much they hold it agrees or is unconnected to the current understanding of atomic decay, fission and fusion.

Alchemists used a great many strange symbols, some of which survive today with different purposes (e.g. ♀, ♂ and ☿ used in biology were originally used by alchemists as well as astrologers). Modern physics and its related technologies have many strange symbols (try to consider seeing ☢ if you had no knowledge of modern science).

An alchemy of a re-mediaeval period—that is, a future period in which technology has ended up at a level similar to that of the mediaeval period—that also worked would likely at least partially retain knowledge from our more technologically advanced time.

At first glance (or first description to the reader) it would be much like mediaeval alchemy in combining some genuine understanding of the facts covered by natural sciences, a relatively poor understanding of the scientific method, and a bunch of weird symbols and legends of devices with great power that could transmutate metals. It could though retain enough information of the past for a device to be recognised as one that was in elder times dropped from powerful flying machines and through impure and perverted chrysopoeia bringing a rain of brimstone that felled cities far greater than any known today and a scourge of wormwood that poisoned all the peoples and the beasts in the field for miles around, salting the earth so that even crops could not grow there for many generations.

As such you could:

  1. Have a period that was reasonably close to mediaeval.
  2. Have nuclear weapons, lying dormant.
  3. Have the characters within the story recognised them as incredibly destructive things.
  4. Have the reader/audience recognised them as nuclear weapons.
  5. Disassembling the device to the point of guaranteeing fatal exposure to all present isn't necessary.
1
source | link

Yes. If you lay the ground for them.

more World of Warcraft than Game of Thrones

Okay, that's a start.

Now, it's a mediaeval-ish period, but there are nuclear weapons in the first place. Either these came from "outside" (e.g. from another planet where there was a higher level of technology) or from a more technologically advanced period (or both, as per Sheri S Tepper's True Game series).

In a mediaeval-ish period it's perfectly sensible to have a belief in processes that can turn one element (as we understand the term today) into another. This belief is chrysopoeia which was described at least as far back as the classical period, grew in the mediaeval period and through to the early modern period as an essential part of the alchemical Great Work and is still believed in today by some with varying degrees of how much they hold it is literal or symbolic of spiritual change on the one hand and how much they hold it agrees or is unconnected to the current understanding of atomic decay, fission and fusion.

Alchemists used a great many strange symbols, some of which survive today with different purposes (e.g. ♀, ♂ and ☿ used in biology were originally used by alchemists as well as astrologers). Modern physics and its related technologies have many strange symbols (try to consider seeing ☢ if you had no knowledge of modern science).

An alchemy of a re-mediaeval period—that is, a future period in which technology has ended up at a level similar to that of the mediaeval period—that also worked would likely at least partially retain knowledge from our more technologically advanced time.

At first glance (or first description to the reader) it would be much like mediaeval alchemy in combining some genuine understanding of the facts covered by natural sciences, a relatively poor understanding of the scientific method, and a bunch of weird symbols and legends of devices with great power that could transmutate metals. It could though retain enough information of the past for a device to be recognised as one that was in elder times dropped from powerful flying machines and through impure and perverted chrysopoeia bringing a rain of brimstone that felled cities far greater than any known today and a scourge of wormwood that poisoned all the peoples and the beasts in the field for miles around, salting the earth so that even crops could not grow there for many generations.

As such you could:

  1. Have a period that was reasonably close to mediaeval.
  2. Have nuclear weapons, lying dormant.
  3. Have the characters within the story recognised them as incredibly destructive things.
  4. Have the reader/audience recognised them as nuclear weapons.