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Within Two Days After Pluto is Eaten

Within Two Days After Pluto is Eaten

I want to clarify a point that I'm not sure other answers are giving here, which is that we have a really, really hard time seeing Pluto. It's literally easier to look at another galaxy than that planet, even from the Hubble telescope. Here is the best picture that I could find from a large terrestrial telescope:

Pluto, Observed from the Gemini Observatory in Hawaii

Of course, observatories aren't looking at Pluto much because there's frankly not much to see. So instead we rely on amateur'samateurs to track it day-to-day, with this being a good result:

A Good Image of Pluto from an Amateur Telescope

So basically we rely on amateurs seeing a dot to know it's there most of the time. If a being approached it that wasn't enormously larger the dot might look a bit bigger, but we would have no idea that it was eating Pluto. Even when it was done, presumably the beast would be at least the size of pluto so we would assume the dot we saw in its place WAS Pluto.

Now once the Pluto-dot disappears because the monster moved away from where Pluto should have been, or once it starts coming closer and we see the dot getting noticeably larger, we're going to say something is happening. Of course it's going to take a day or two of "odd" observation reports coming in before a big telescope is re-oriented in that direction (doing so will disrupt the observations it is currently taking and so involves a lot of bureaucracy).

Given the astronomical distances involved however - and the fact that even Jupiter is small compared to a distant galaxy - we aren't going to actually know WHAT happened until that sucker gets pretty close. Depending on size it may have to be about as close as Saturn or closer before we could get any real definition.

EDIT / Update

EDIT / Update

Note that if the planet-eater is MUCH larger than Pluto we would see that SOMETHING was different because we would see a much larger dot. We would know that SOMETHING was happening, but still would have no idea what. Exactly how close it would have to be before we could identify what was happening would be a function of the size of the creature, which is unstated. Keep this image in mind though:

Relative Planet Sizes

Something the size of Earth could easily swallow Pluto and still not be properly visible even if it were as close as Saturn. I like to use Saturn as an example because we can get a pretty good picture of it from Earth... as in decent resolution, clear images. But it's also MANY, MANY times larger than Earth. So be sure to adjust the distance away that we can properly see it to its size.

Unless your monster is large enough to eat giants like Neptune or Uranus I think you'd be safe saying we couldn't get a clear enough image to understand the threat until it was as close as / closer than Jupiter. If it is on the scale of gas giants though, then by the time it hits Saturn's distance we can probably tell you the color of its eyes.

Within Two Days After Pluto is Eaten

I want to clarify a point that I'm not sure other answers are giving here, which is that we have a really, really hard time seeing Pluto. It's literally easier to look at another galaxy than that planet, even from the Hubble telescope. Here is the best picture that I could find from a large terrestrial telescope:

Pluto, Observed from the Gemini Observatory in Hawaii

Of course, observatories aren't looking at Pluto much because there's frankly not much to see. So instead we rely on amateur's to track it day-to-day, with this being a good result:

A Good Image of Pluto from an Amateur Telescope

So basically we rely on amateurs seeing a dot to know it's there most of the time. If a being approached it that wasn't enormously larger the dot might look a bit bigger, but we would have no idea that it was eating Pluto. Even when it was done, presumably the beast would be at least the size of pluto so we would assume the dot we saw in its place WAS Pluto.

Now once the Pluto-dot disappears because the monster moved away from where Pluto should have been, or once it starts coming closer and we see the dot getting noticeably larger, we're going to say something is happening. Of course it's going to take a day or two of "odd" observation reports coming in before a big telescope is re-oriented in that direction (doing so will disrupt the observations it is currently taking and so involves a lot of bureaucracy).

Given the astronomical distances involved however - and the fact that even Jupiter is small compared to a distant galaxy - we aren't going to actually know WHAT happened until that sucker gets pretty close. Depending on size it may have to be about as close as Saturn or closer before we could get any real definition.

EDIT / Update

Note that if the planet-eater is MUCH larger than Pluto we would see that SOMETHING was different because we would see a much larger dot. We would know that SOMETHING was happening, but still would have no idea what. Exactly how close it would have to be before we could identify what was happening would be a function of the size of the creature, which is unstated. Keep this image in mind though:

Relative Planet Sizes

Something the size of Earth could easily swallow Pluto and still not be properly visible even if it were as close as Saturn. I like to use Saturn as an example because we can get a pretty good picture of it from Earth... as in decent resolution, clear images. But it's also MANY, MANY times larger than Earth. So be sure to adjust the distance away that we can properly see it to its size.

Unless your monster is large enough to eat giants like Neptune or Uranus I think you'd be safe saying we couldn't get a clear enough image to understand the threat until it was as close as / closer than Jupiter. If it is on the scale of gas giants though, then by the time it hits Saturn's distance we can probably tell you the color of its eyes.

Within Two Days After Pluto is Eaten

I want to clarify a point that I'm not sure other answers are giving here, which is that we have a really, really hard time seeing Pluto. It's literally easier to look at another galaxy than that planet, even from the Hubble telescope. Here is the best picture that I could find from a large terrestrial telescope:

Pluto, Observed from the Gemini Observatory in Hawaii

Of course, observatories aren't looking at Pluto much because there's frankly not much to see. So instead we rely on amateurs to track it day-to-day, with this being a good result:

A Good Image of Pluto from an Amateur Telescope

So basically we rely on amateurs seeing a dot to know it's there most of the time. If a being approached it that wasn't enormously larger the dot might look a bit bigger, but we would have no idea that it was eating Pluto. Even when it was done, presumably the beast would be at least the size of pluto so we would assume the dot we saw in its place WAS Pluto.

Now once the Pluto-dot disappears because the monster moved away from where Pluto should have been, or once it starts coming closer and we see the dot getting noticeably larger, we're going to say something is happening. Of course it's going to take a day or two of "odd" observation reports coming in before a big telescope is re-oriented in that direction (doing so will disrupt the observations it is currently taking and so involves a lot of bureaucracy).

Given the astronomical distances involved however and the fact that even Jupiter is small compared to a distant galaxy we aren't going to actually know WHAT happened until that sucker gets pretty close. Depending on size it may have to be about as close as Saturn or closer before we could get any real definition.

EDIT / Update

Note that if the planet-eater is MUCH larger than Pluto we would see that SOMETHING was different because we would see a much larger dot. We would know that SOMETHING was happening, but still would have no idea what. Exactly how close it would have to be before we could identify what was happening would be a function of the size of the creature, which is unstated. Keep this image in mind though:

Relative Planet Sizes

Something the size of Earth could easily swallow Pluto and still not be properly visible even if it were as close as Saturn. I like to use Saturn as an example because we can get a pretty good picture of it from Earth... as in decent resolution, clear images. But it's also MANY, MANY times larger than Earth. So be sure to adjust the distance away that we can properly see it to its size.

Unless your monster is large enough to eat giants like Neptune or Uranus I think you'd be safe saying we couldn't get a clear enough image to understand the threat until it was as close as / closer than Jupiter. If it is on the scale of gas giants though, then by the time it hits Saturn's distance we can probably tell you the color of its eyes.

2 added 1252 characters in body
source | link

Within Two Days After Pluto is Eaten

I want to clarify a point that I'm not sure other answers are giving here, which is that we have a really, really hard time seeing Pluto. It's literally easier to look at another galaxy than that planet, even from the Hubble telescope. Here is the best picture that I could find from a large terrestrial telescope:

Pluto, Observed from the Gemini Observatory in Hawaii

Of course, observatories aren't looking at Pluto much because there's frankly not much to see. So instead we rely on amateur's to track it day-to-day, with this being a good result:

A Good Image of Pluto from an Amateur Telescope

So basically we rely on amateurs seeing a dot to know it's there most of the time. If a being approached it that wasn't enormously larger the dot might look a bit bigger, but we would have no idea that it was eating Pluto. Even when it was done, presumably the beast would be at least the size of pluto so we would assume the dot we saw in its place WAS Pluto.

Now once the Pluto-dot disappears because the monster moved away from where Pluto should have been, or once it starts coming closer and we see the dot getting noticeably larger, we're going to say something is happening. Of course it's going to take a day or two of "odd" observation reports coming in before a big telescope is re-oriented in that direction (doing so will disrupt the observations it is currently taking and so involves a lot of bureaucracy).

Given the astronomical distances involved however - and the fact that even Jupiter is small compared to a distant galaxy - we aren't going to actually know WHAT happened until that sucker gets pretty close. Depending on size it may have to be about as close as Saturn or closer before we could get any real definition.

EDIT / Update

Note that if the planet-eater is MUCH larger than Pluto we would see that SOMETHING was different because we would see a much larger dot. We would know that SOMETHING was happening, but still would have no idea what. Exactly how close it would have to be before we could identify what was happening would be a function of the size of the creature, which is unstated. Keep this image in mind though:

Relative Planet Sizes

Something the size of Earth could easily swallow Pluto and still not be properly visible even if it were as close as Saturn. I like to use Saturn as an example because we can get a pretty good picture of it from Earth... as in decent resolution, clear images. But it's also MANY, MANY times larger than Earth. So be sure to adjust the distance away that we can properly see it to its size.

Unless your monster is large enough to eat giants like Neptune or Uranus I think you'd be safe saying we couldn't get a clear enough image to understand the threat until it was as close as / closer than Jupiter. If it is on the scale of gas giants though, then by the time it hits Saturn's distance we can probably tell you the color of its eyes.

Within Two Days After Pluto is Eaten

I want to clarify a point that I'm not sure other answers are giving here, which is that we have a really, really hard time seeing Pluto. It's literally easier to look at another galaxy than that planet, even from the Hubble telescope. Here is the best picture that I could find from a large terrestrial telescope:

Pluto, Observed from the Gemini Observatory in Hawaii

Of course, observatories aren't looking at Pluto much because there's frankly not much to see. So instead we rely on amateur's to track it day-to-day, with this being a good result:

A Good Image of Pluto from an Amateur Telescope

So basically we rely on amateurs seeing a dot to know it's there most of the time. If a being approached it that wasn't enormously larger the dot might look a bit bigger, but we would have no idea that it was eating Pluto. Even when it was done, presumably the beast would be at least the size of pluto so we would assume the dot we saw in its place WAS Pluto.

Now once the Pluto-dot disappears because the monster moved away from where Pluto should have been, or once it starts coming closer and we see the dot getting noticeably larger, we're going to say something is happening. Of course it's going to take a day or two of "odd" observation reports coming in before a big telescope is re-oriented in that direction (doing so will disrupt the observations it is currently taking and so involves a lot of bureaucracy).

Given the astronomical distances involved however - and the fact that even Jupiter is small compared to a distant galaxy - we aren't going to actually know WHAT happened until that sucker gets pretty close. Depending on size it may have to be about as close as Saturn or closer before we could get any real definition.

Within Two Days After Pluto is Eaten

I want to clarify a point that I'm not sure other answers are giving here, which is that we have a really, really hard time seeing Pluto. It's literally easier to look at another galaxy than that planet, even from the Hubble telescope. Here is the best picture that I could find from a large terrestrial telescope:

Pluto, Observed from the Gemini Observatory in Hawaii

Of course, observatories aren't looking at Pluto much because there's frankly not much to see. So instead we rely on amateur's to track it day-to-day, with this being a good result:

A Good Image of Pluto from an Amateur Telescope

So basically we rely on amateurs seeing a dot to know it's there most of the time. If a being approached it that wasn't enormously larger the dot might look a bit bigger, but we would have no idea that it was eating Pluto. Even when it was done, presumably the beast would be at least the size of pluto so we would assume the dot we saw in its place WAS Pluto.

Now once the Pluto-dot disappears because the monster moved away from where Pluto should have been, or once it starts coming closer and we see the dot getting noticeably larger, we're going to say something is happening. Of course it's going to take a day or two of "odd" observation reports coming in before a big telescope is re-oriented in that direction (doing so will disrupt the observations it is currently taking and so involves a lot of bureaucracy).

Given the astronomical distances involved however - and the fact that even Jupiter is small compared to a distant galaxy - we aren't going to actually know WHAT happened until that sucker gets pretty close. Depending on size it may have to be about as close as Saturn or closer before we could get any real definition.

EDIT / Update

Note that if the planet-eater is MUCH larger than Pluto we would see that SOMETHING was different because we would see a much larger dot. We would know that SOMETHING was happening, but still would have no idea what. Exactly how close it would have to be before we could identify what was happening would be a function of the size of the creature, which is unstated. Keep this image in mind though:

Relative Planet Sizes

Something the size of Earth could easily swallow Pluto and still not be properly visible even if it were as close as Saturn. I like to use Saturn as an example because we can get a pretty good picture of it from Earth... as in decent resolution, clear images. But it's also MANY, MANY times larger than Earth. So be sure to adjust the distance away that we can properly see it to its size.

Unless your monster is large enough to eat giants like Neptune or Uranus I think you'd be safe saying we couldn't get a clear enough image to understand the threat until it was as close as / closer than Jupiter. If it is on the scale of gas giants though, then by the time it hits Saturn's distance we can probably tell you the color of its eyes.

1
source | link

Within Two Days After Pluto is Eaten

I want to clarify a point that I'm not sure other answers are giving here, which is that we have a really, really hard time seeing Pluto. It's literally easier to look at another galaxy than that planet, even from the Hubble telescope. Here is the best picture that I could find from a large terrestrial telescope:

Pluto, Observed from the Gemini Observatory in Hawaii

Of course, observatories aren't looking at Pluto much because there's frankly not much to see. So instead we rely on amateur's to track it day-to-day, with this being a good result:

A Good Image of Pluto from an Amateur Telescope

So basically we rely on amateurs seeing a dot to know it's there most of the time. If a being approached it that wasn't enormously larger the dot might look a bit bigger, but we would have no idea that it was eating Pluto. Even when it was done, presumably the beast would be at least the size of pluto so we would assume the dot we saw in its place WAS Pluto.

Now once the Pluto-dot disappears because the monster moved away from where Pluto should have been, or once it starts coming closer and we see the dot getting noticeably larger, we're going to say something is happening. Of course it's going to take a day or two of "odd" observation reports coming in before a big telescope is re-oriented in that direction (doing so will disrupt the observations it is currently taking and so involves a lot of bureaucracy).

Given the astronomical distances involved however - and the fact that even Jupiter is small compared to a distant galaxy - we aren't going to actually know WHAT happened until that sucker gets pretty close. Depending on size it may have to be about as close as Saturn or closer before we could get any real definition.