Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
2 I fixed grammar and removed the bit at the bottom, which should be either a comment or a meta post.
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How large could a planet be yet still approach 1 earthEarth gravity and support life as we know it?

Life on earthEarth has developed with one earthEarth-gravity, more or less, as a constant for epochs. Our bones and organs both are adapted to this amount of pull, (or push, depending on how sciency you want to put it, right?) Butbut could a larger planet have a similar pull (at the surface) based on various factors: such as less planetary density, slower planetary rotation, or a counter--pull from another structure, like being surrounded by a dense shell?

Based on this conception, that it's possible to explain a larger planet with one earthEarth gravity at the surface supporting life as on our planet, how large could that other planet be, and how could that happen?

[you can only post once every 40 minutes -- I've never posted here before though -- what's up with the warning?]

How large could a planet be yet still approach 1 earth gravity and support life as we know it?

Life on earth has developed with one earth-gravity, more or less, as a constant for epochs. Our bones and organs both are adapted to this amount of pull (or push, depending on how sciency you want to put it, right?) But could a larger planet have a similar pull (at the surface) based on various factors: less planetary density, slower planetary rotation, a counter--pull from another structure, like being surrounded by a dense shell?

Based on this conception, that it's possible to explain a larger planet with one earth gravity at the surface supporting life as on our planet, how large could that other planet be, and how could that happen?

[you can only post once every 40 minutes -- I've never posted here before though -- what's up with the warning?]

How large could a planet be yet still approach 1 Earth gravity and support life as we know it?

Life on Earth has developed with one Earth-gravity, more or less, as a constant for epochs. Our bones and organs both are adapted to this amount of pull, (or push, depending on how sciency you want to put it, right?) but could a larger planet have a similar pull (at the surface) based on various factors such as less planetary density, slower planetary rotation, or a counter-pull from another structure, like being surrounded by a dense shell?

Based on this conception that it's possible to explain a larger planet with one Earth gravity at the surface supporting life as on our planet, how large could that other planet be, and how could that happen?

1
source | link

How large could a planet be yet still approach 1 earth gravity and support life as we know it?

Life on earth has developed with one earth-gravity, more or less, as a constant for epochs. Our bones and organs both are adapted to this amount of pull (or push, depending on how sciency you want to put it, right?) But could a larger planet have a similar pull (at the surface) based on various factors: less planetary density, slower planetary rotation, a counter--pull from another structure, like being surrounded by a dense shell?

Based on this conception, that it's possible to explain a larger planet with one earth gravity at the surface supporting life as on our planet, how large could that other planet be, and how could that happen?

[you can only post once every 40 minutes -- I've never posted here before though -- what's up with the warning?]