Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
2 Removed my obnoxious formatting.
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TL,DR: TL,DR: Would humans beings from Earth be seriously injured or killed from the long period variation of the main color a bunch of stars projects on a planet?

My TL;DR: Yes.

Could such a scenario (referring to the planet being within the habitable zones of all three stars) exist? I'd think not. This arrangement would not be stable. Sure, multiple-star systemsmultiple-star systems exist - and there have been systems discovered with up to 7 stars - but there's almost no way the planet could continue to be in the habitable zone of all three for more than a very short amount of time. In fact, I think it's likely that the system would consist of one star orbiting the other two, as is the case in Alpha Centauri.

But I guess I'll disregard that, although I think this is a valid point for the tag. I can elaborate on this if you want me to, but I can avoid it for now.

Back to the question:

TL,DR: Would humans beings from Earth be seriously injured or killed from the long period variation of the main color a bunch of stars projects on a planet?

I'll go with a sad yes here. It does depend on how far away from each of the stars the planet is, but I think that, given how large the stars are, that the output of radiation will be pretty huge. The SunSun has a luminosity of 3.826 $3.826 \times 10^{24} \text { Watts}$$\times$ 1024 Watts. Adding together the probable luminosities of these three stars, we get $518 \text { solar luminosities}$518 solar luminosities (a red giantred giant, e.g. AldebaranAldebaran) $+ 1 \text { solar luminosity}$+ 1 solar luminosity (a Sun-like star) $+ 91,000 \text { solar luminosities}$+ 91,000 solar luminosities (a blue star, e.g. Zeta OphiuchiZeta Ophiuchi) $=91,519 \text { solar luminosities}$$=$ 91,519 solar luminosities. That's pretty bright. It also means a lot of UV radiation, meaning that unless there's a thick ozone layer on the planet, these people are going to be pretty unhappy.

TL,DR: TL,DR: Would humans beings from Earth be seriously injured or killed from the long period variation of the main color a bunch of stars projects on a planet?

My TL;DR: Yes.

Could such a scenario (referring to the planet being within the habitable zones of all three stars) exist? I'd think not. This arrangement would not be stable. Sure, multiple-star systems exist - and there have been systems discovered with up to 7 stars - but there's almost no way the planet could continue to be in the habitable zone of all three for more than a very short amount of time. In fact, I think it's likely that the system would consist of one star orbiting the other two, as is the case in Alpha Centauri.

But I guess I'll disregard that, although I think this is a valid point for the tag. I can elaborate on this if you want me to, but I can avoid it for now.

Back to the question:

TL,DR: Would humans beings from Earth be seriously injured or killed from the long period variation of the main color a bunch of stars projects on a planet?

I'll go with a sad yes here. It does depend on how far away from each of the stars the planet is, but I think that, given how large the stars are, that the output of radiation will be pretty huge. The Sun has a luminosity of $3.826 \times 10^{24} \text { Watts}$. Adding together the probable luminosities of these three stars, we get $518 \text { solar luminosities}$ (a red giant, e.g. Aldebaran) $+ 1 \text { solar luminosity}$ (a Sun-like star) $+ 91,000 \text { solar luminosities}$ (a blue star, e.g. Zeta Ophiuchi) $=91,519 \text { solar luminosities}$. That's pretty bright. It also means a lot of UV radiation, meaning that unless there's a thick ozone layer on the planet, these people are going to be pretty unhappy.

TL,DR: TL,DR: Would humans beings from Earth be seriously injured or killed from the long period variation of the main color a bunch of stars projects on a planet?

My TL;DR: Yes.

Could such a scenario (referring to the planet being within the habitable zones of all three stars) exist? I'd think not. This arrangement would not be stable. Sure, multiple-star systems exist - and there have been systems discovered with up to 7 stars - but there's almost no way the planet could continue to be in the habitable zone of all three for more than a very short amount of time. In fact, I think it's likely that the system would consist of one star orbiting the other two, as is the case in Alpha Centauri.

But I guess I'll disregard that, although I think this is a valid point for the tag. I can elaborate on this if you want me to, but I can avoid it for now.

Back to the question:

TL,DR: Would humans beings from Earth be seriously injured or killed from the long period variation of the main color a bunch of stars projects on a planet?

I'll go with a sad yes here. It does depend on how far away from each of the stars the planet is, but I think that, given how large the stars are, that the output of radiation will be pretty huge. The Sun has a luminosity of 3.826 $\times$ 1024 Watts. Adding together the probable luminosities of these three stars, we get 518 solar luminosities (a red giant, e.g. Aldebaran) + 1 solar luminosity (a Sun-like star) + 91,000 solar luminosities (a blue star, e.g. Zeta Ophiuchi) $=$ 91,519 solar luminosities. That's pretty bright. It also means a lot of UV radiation, meaning that unless there's a thick ozone layer on the planet, these people are going to be pretty unhappy.

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TL,DR: TL,DR: Would humans beings from Earth be seriously injured or killed from the long period variation of the main color a bunch of stars projects on a planet?

My TL;DR: Yes.

Could such a scenario (referring to the planet being within the habitable zones of all three stars) exist? I'd think not. This arrangement would not be stable. Sure, multiple-star systems exist - and there have been systems discovered with up to 7 stars - but there's almost no way the planet could continue to be in the habitable zone of all three for more than a very short amount of time. In fact, I think it's likely that the system would consist of one star orbiting the other two, as is the case in Alpha Centauri.

But I guess I'll disregard that, although I think this is a valid point for the tag. I can elaborate on this if you want me to, but I can avoid it for now.

Back to the question:

TL,DR: Would humans beings from Earth be seriously injured or killed from the long period variation of the main color a bunch of stars projects on a planet?

I'll go with a sad yes here. It does depend on how far away from each of the stars the planet is, but I think that, given how large the stars are, that the output of radiation will be pretty huge. The Sun has a luminosity of $3.826 \times 10^{24} \text { Watts}$. Adding together the probable luminosities of these three stars, we get $518 \text { solar luminosities}$ (a red giant, e.g. Aldebaran) $+ 1 \text { solar luminosity}$ (a Sun-like star) $+ 91,000 \text { solar luminosities}$ (a blue star, e.g. Zeta Ophiuchi) $=91,519 \text { solar luminosities}$. That's pretty bright. It also means a lot of UV radiation, meaning that unless there's a thick ozone layer on the planet, these people are going to be pretty unhappy.