3 Grammar touch-ups
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Robots, always robots

1. NASA mindset is to kill as low amount offew humans as possible

Space is dangerous and evil1. Even tiniest error can effectively kill you. Most of the space program is done by NASA and the west. They have the same mindset: Kill as leastfew as possible.

It may sound obvious, but during the cold war the Russians had completely different mindset: Get the job done, and if you die in the process, we will celebrate you as a hero.

Yes, I know I am exaggerating here, but the point is, that as soon as someone is killed in space, people always ask the question: Is space exploration worth it?

2. No one cares about a dead machine

If an unmanned mission fails, the info about it barely makes it to first page of news. Mission success? It will be on first pages if it is something really interesting. Otherwise, no one cares. This is extra plus for robotic missions.

3. Caution: Living in space may cause health issues

Consult with your doctor before going to space. Truth is, that we really do not know what arethe long term-term effects on human bodyof being in low gravity for longer timeare on a human body. We are trying to figure out the effects on human body, and we are going to find out pretty soon.

But one we know for sure: Being in space and mining asteroids will definitely have some effects on human body. We know that it will have also some effects on machines. But we do not care about machines (see point 1 and 2).

In nutshell: We are going to use as many robots as possible.

I think it is plausible to assume that some humans will be involved in asteroid mining-mining operations, but the people will be dying. So there will be a moral push to replace them with robots and machines.

1: It does not mean that space it intentionally evil towards anyone. PureThe pure nature of space is that not many live organisms can survive in space without any protection2.

2: And even when being protected, survival in space is hard. [citation needed]

Robots, always robots

1. NASA mindset is to kill as low amount of humans as possible

Space is dangerous and evil1. Even tiniest error can effectively kill you. Most of the space program is done by NASA and the west. They have the same mindset: Kill as least as possible.

It may sound obvious, but during the cold war the Russians had completely different mindset: Get the job done and if you die in the process, we will celebrate you as a hero.

Yes, I know I am exaggerating here, but the point is, that as soon as someone is killed in space, people always ask the question: Is space exploration worth it?

2. No one cares about dead machine

If unmanned mission fails, the info about it barely makes it to first page of news. Mission success? It will be on first pages if it is something really interesting. Otherwise no one cares. This is extra plus for robotic missions.

3. Caution: Living in space may cause health issues

Consult with your doctor before going to space. Truth is, that we really do not know what are long term effects on human body being in low gravity for longer time. We are trying to figure out the effects on human body and we are going to find out pretty soon.

But one we know for sure: Being in space and mining asteroids will definitely have some effects on human body. We know that it will have also some effects on machines. But we do not care about machines (see point 1 and 2).

In nutshell: We are going to use as many robots as possible.

I think it is plausible to assume that some humans will be involved in asteroid mining operations, but the people will be dying. So there will be moral push to replace them with robots and machines.

1: It does not mean that space it intentionally evil towards anyone. Pure nature of space is that not many live organisms can survive in space without any protection2.

2: And even when being protected, survival in space is hard. [citation needed]

Robots, always robots

1. NASA mindset is to kill as few humans as possible

Space is dangerous and evil1. Even tiniest error can effectively kill you. Most of the space program is done by NASA and the west. They have the same mindset: Kill as few as possible.

It may sound obvious, but during the cold war the Russians had completely different mindset: Get the job done, and if you die in the process, we will celebrate you as a hero.

Yes, I know I am exaggerating here, but the point is that as soon as someone is killed in space, people always ask the question: Is space exploration worth it?

2. No one cares about a dead machine

If an unmanned mission fails, the info about it barely makes it to first page of news. Mission success? It will be on first pages if it is something really interesting. Otherwise, no one cares. This is extra plus for robotic missions.

3. Caution: Living in space may cause health issues

Consult with your doctor before going to space. Truth is, that we really do not know what the long-term effects of being in low gravity are on a human body. We are trying to figure out the effects on human body, and we are going to find out pretty soon.

But one we know for sure: Being in space and mining asteroids will definitely have some effects on human body. We know that it will have also some effects on machines. But we do not care about machines (see point 1 and 2).

In nutshell: We are going to use as many robots as possible.

I think it is plausible to assume that some humans will be involved in asteroid-mining operations, but the people will be dying. So there will be a moral push to replace them with robots and machines.

1: It does not mean that space it intentionally evil towards anyone. The pure nature of space is that not many live organisms can survive in space without any protection2.

2: And even when being protected, survival in space is hard. [citation needed]

2 added note about evil space for Frostfyre
source | link

Robots, always robots

1. NASA mindset is to kill as low amount of humans as possible

Space is dangerous and evil1. Even tiniest error can effectively kill you. Most of the space program is done by NASA and the west. They have the same mindset: Kill as least as possible.

It may sound obvious, but during the cold war the Russians had completely different mindset: Get the job done and if you die in the process, we will celebrate you as a hero.

Yes, I know I am exaggerating here, but the point is, that as soon as someone is killed in space, people always ask the question: Is space exploration worth it?

2. No one cares about dead machine

If unmanned mission fails, the info about it barely makes it to first page of news. Mission success? It will be on first pages if it is something really interesting. Otherwise no one cares. This is extra plus for robotic missions.

3. Caution: Living in space may cause health issues

Consult with your doctor before going to space. Truth is, that we really do not know what are long term effects on human body being in low gravity for longer time. We are trying to figure out the effects on human body and we are going to find out pretty soon.

But one we know for sure: Being in space and mining asteroids will definitely have some effects on human body. We know that it will have also some effects on machines. But we do not care about machines (see point 1 and 2).

In nutshell: We are going to use as many robots as possible.

I think it is plausible to assume that some humans will be involved in asteroid mining operations, but the people will be dying. So there will be moral push to replace them with robots and machines.

1: It does not mean that space it intentionally evil towards anyone. Pure nature of space is that not many live organisms can survive in space without any protection2.

2: And even when being protected, survival in space is hard. [citation needed]

Robots, always robots

1. NASA mindset is to kill as low amount of humans as possible

Space is dangerous and evil. Even tiniest error can effectively kill you. Most of the space program is done by NASA and the west. They have the same mindset: Kill as least as possible.

It may sound obvious, but during the cold war the Russians had completely different mindset: Get the job done and if you die in the process, we will celebrate you as a hero.

Yes, I know I am exaggerating here, but the point is, that as soon as someone is killed in space, people always ask the question: Is space exploration worth it?

2. No one cares about dead machine

If unmanned mission fails, the info about it barely makes it to first page of news. Mission success? It will be on first pages if it is something really interesting. Otherwise no one cares. This is extra plus for robotic missions.

3. Caution: Living in space may cause health issues

Consult with your doctor before going to space. Truth is, that we really do not know what are long term effects on human body being in low gravity for longer time. We are trying to figure out the effects on human body and we are going to find out pretty soon.

But one we know for sure: Being in space and mining asteroids will definitely have some effects on human body. We know that it will have also some effects on machines. But we do not care about machines (see point 1 and 2).

In nutshell: We are going to use as many robots as possible.

I think it is plausible to assume that some humans will be involved in asteroid mining operations, but the people will be dying. So there will be moral push to replace them with robots and machines.

Robots, always robots

1. NASA mindset is to kill as low amount of humans as possible

Space is dangerous and evil1. Even tiniest error can effectively kill you. Most of the space program is done by NASA and the west. They have the same mindset: Kill as least as possible.

It may sound obvious, but during the cold war the Russians had completely different mindset: Get the job done and if you die in the process, we will celebrate you as a hero.

Yes, I know I am exaggerating here, but the point is, that as soon as someone is killed in space, people always ask the question: Is space exploration worth it?

2. No one cares about dead machine

If unmanned mission fails, the info about it barely makes it to first page of news. Mission success? It will be on first pages if it is something really interesting. Otherwise no one cares. This is extra plus for robotic missions.

3. Caution: Living in space may cause health issues

Consult with your doctor before going to space. Truth is, that we really do not know what are long term effects on human body being in low gravity for longer time. We are trying to figure out the effects on human body and we are going to find out pretty soon.

But one we know for sure: Being in space and mining asteroids will definitely have some effects on human body. We know that it will have also some effects on machines. But we do not care about machines (see point 1 and 2).

In nutshell: We are going to use as many robots as possible.

I think it is plausible to assume that some humans will be involved in asteroid mining operations, but the people will be dying. So there will be moral push to replace them with robots and machines.

1: It does not mean that space it intentionally evil towards anyone. Pure nature of space is that not many live organisms can survive in space without any protection2.

2: And even when being protected, survival in space is hard. [citation needed]

1
source | link

Robots, always robots

1. NASA mindset is to kill as low amount of humans as possible

Space is dangerous and evil. Even tiniest error can effectively kill you. Most of the space program is done by NASA and the west. They have the same mindset: Kill as least as possible.

It may sound obvious, but during the cold war the Russians had completely different mindset: Get the job done and if you die in the process, we will celebrate you as a hero.

Yes, I know I am exaggerating here, but the point is, that as soon as someone is killed in space, people always ask the question: Is space exploration worth it?

2. No one cares about dead machine

If unmanned mission fails, the info about it barely makes it to first page of news. Mission success? It will be on first pages if it is something really interesting. Otherwise no one cares. This is extra plus for robotic missions.

3. Caution: Living in space may cause health issues

Consult with your doctor before going to space. Truth is, that we really do not know what are long term effects on human body being in low gravity for longer time. We are trying to figure out the effects on human body and we are going to find out pretty soon.

But one we know for sure: Being in space and mining asteroids will definitely have some effects on human body. We know that it will have also some effects on machines. But we do not care about machines (see point 1 and 2).

In nutshell: We are going to use as many robots as possible.

I think it is plausible to assume that some humans will be involved in asteroid mining operations, but the people will be dying. So there will be moral push to replace them with robots and machines.