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It seems like the most interesting combat would be that which treated the lightsaber as a "complete" weapon, taking advantage of its unique properties, rather than just a glorified sword. Samuel's illustrated answerillustrated answer demonstrates some of these, such as its ability to be quickly switched on and off, and its "infinite sharpness" (and vulnerability of its wielder to having parts of their body force-pushed/pulled into it).

The lightsaber is not a ranged weapon. This might mean that lightsaber duels would start by the opponents attempting to close on one another as quickly as possible, so as not to give the other the time to turn on their lightsaber and get into a defensive posture. This could result in elements of a more traditional hand-to-hand fighting style.

In close-quarters hand-to-hand combat, a lightsaber that has yet to be turned on would be much more like a firearm than, say, a knife, in that it would be no deadlier than a blunt instrument, but anything that gets in front of its opening could be destroyed. That could lead to an interesting combat style like the "gun kata" demonstrated in the final scene in the film Equilibirum -- the focus was not on disarming your opponent, but in bringing your pistol into an orientation where it would be pointing at some part of the body of your opponent, so you could fire.

Use of the Force largely renders this question moot, as you could use it to simply switch off your opponent's lightsaber, or more permanently mis-align/damage its internal components so it no longer worked. It's also a much more elegant & low-effort attack to tug a crystal a few millimeters off-center than it is to force a large appendage of a strong person in a direction it doesn't want to go. In any event, it's certainly a compelling reason to use a more conventional melee weapon.

It seems like the most interesting combat would be that which treated the lightsaber as a "complete" weapon, taking advantage of its unique properties, rather than just a glorified sword. Samuel's illustrated answer demonstrates some of these, such as its ability to be quickly switched on and off, and its "infinite sharpness" (and vulnerability of its wielder to having parts of their body force-pushed/pulled into it).

The lightsaber is not a ranged weapon. This might mean that lightsaber duels would start by the opponents attempting to close on one another as quickly as possible, so as not to give the other the time to turn on their lightsaber and get into a defensive posture. This could result in elements of a more traditional hand-to-hand fighting style.

In close-quarters hand-to-hand combat, a lightsaber that has yet to be turned on would be much more like a firearm than, say, a knife, in that it would be no deadlier than a blunt instrument, but anything that gets in front of its opening could be destroyed. That could lead to an interesting combat style like the "gun kata" demonstrated in the final scene in the film Equilibirum -- the focus was not on disarming your opponent, but in bringing your pistol into an orientation where it would be pointing at some part of the body of your opponent, so you could fire.

Use of the Force largely renders this question moot, as you could use it to simply switch off your opponent's lightsaber, or more permanently mis-align/damage its internal components so it no longer worked. It's also a much more elegant & low-effort attack to tug a crystal a few millimeters off-center than it is to force a large appendage of a strong person in a direction it doesn't want to go. In any event, it's certainly a compelling reason to use a more conventional melee weapon.

It seems like the most interesting combat would be that which treated the lightsaber as a "complete" weapon, taking advantage of its unique properties, rather than just a glorified sword. Samuel's illustrated answer demonstrates some of these, such as its ability to be quickly switched on and off, and its "infinite sharpness" (and vulnerability of its wielder to having parts of their body force-pushed/pulled into it).

The lightsaber is not a ranged weapon. This might mean that lightsaber duels would start by the opponents attempting to close on one another as quickly as possible, so as not to give the other the time to turn on their lightsaber and get into a defensive posture. This could result in elements of a more traditional hand-to-hand fighting style.

In close-quarters hand-to-hand combat, a lightsaber that has yet to be turned on would be much more like a firearm than, say, a knife, in that it would be no deadlier than a blunt instrument, but anything that gets in front of its opening could be destroyed. That could lead to an interesting combat style like the "gun kata" demonstrated in the final scene in the film Equilibirum -- the focus was not on disarming your opponent, but in bringing your pistol into an orientation where it would be pointing at some part of the body of your opponent, so you could fire.

Use of the Force largely renders this question moot, as you could use it to simply switch off your opponent's lightsaber, or more permanently mis-align/damage its internal components so it no longer worked. It's also a much more elegant & low-effort attack to tug a crystal a few millimeters off-center than it is to force a large appendage of a strong person in a direction it doesn't want to go. In any event, it's certainly a compelling reason to use a more conventional melee weapon.

4 added explanation
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It seems like the most interesting combat would be that which treated the lightsaber as a "complete" weapon, taking advantage of its unique properties, rather than just a glorified sword. Samuel's illustrated answer demonstrates some of these, such as its ability to be quickly switched on and off, and its "infinite sharpness" (and vulnerability of its wielder to having parts of their body force-pushed/pulled into it).

The lightsaber is not a ranged weapon. This might mean that lightsaber duels would start by the opponents attempting to close on one another as quickly as possible, so as not to give the other the time to turn on their lightsaber and get into a defensive posture. This could result in elements of a more traditional hand-to-hand fighting style.

In close-quarters hand-to-hand combat, a lightsaber that has yet to be turned on would be much more like a firearm than, say, a knife, in that it would be no deadlier than a blunt instrument, but anything that gets in front of its opening could be destroyed. That could lead to an interesting combat style like the "gun kata" demonstrated in the final scene in the film Equilibirum -- the focus was not on disarming your opponent, but in bringing your pistol into an orientation where it would be pointing at some part of the body of your opponent, so you could fire.

Use of the Force largely renders this question moot, as you could use it to simply switch off your opponent's lightsaber, or more permanently mis-align/damage its internal components so it no longer worked. Certainly It's also a much more elegant & low-effort attack to tug a crystal a few millimeters off-center than it is to force a large appendage of a strong person in a direction it doesn't want to go. In any event, it's certainly a compelling reason to use a more conventional melee weapon.

It seems like the most interesting combat would be that which treated the lightsaber as a "complete" weapon, taking advantage of its unique properties, rather than just a glorified sword. Samuel's illustrated answer demonstrates some of these, such as its ability to be quickly switched on and off, and its "infinite sharpness" (and vulnerability of its wielder to having parts of their body force-pushed/pulled into it).

The lightsaber is not a ranged weapon. This might mean that lightsaber duels would start by the opponents attempting to close on one another as quickly as possible, so as not to give the other the time to turn on their lightsaber and get into a defensive posture. This could result in elements of a more traditional hand-to-hand fighting style.

In close-quarters hand-to-hand combat, a lightsaber that has yet to be turned on would be much more like a firearm than, say, a knife, in that it would be no deadlier than a blunt instrument, but anything that gets in front of its opening could be destroyed. That could lead to an interesting combat style like the "gun kata" demonstrated in the final scene in the film Equilibirum -- the focus was not on disarming your opponent, but in bringing your pistol into an orientation where it would be pointing at some part of the body of your opponent, so you could fire.

Use of the Force largely renders this question moot, as you could use it to simply switch off your opponent's lightsaber, or more permanently mis-align/damage its internal components so it no longer worked. Certainly a compelling reason to use a more conventional melee weapon.

It seems like the most interesting combat would be that which treated the lightsaber as a "complete" weapon, taking advantage of its unique properties, rather than just a glorified sword. Samuel's illustrated answer demonstrates some of these, such as its ability to be quickly switched on and off, and its "infinite sharpness" (and vulnerability of its wielder to having parts of their body force-pushed/pulled into it).

The lightsaber is not a ranged weapon. This might mean that lightsaber duels would start by the opponents attempting to close on one another as quickly as possible, so as not to give the other the time to turn on their lightsaber and get into a defensive posture. This could result in elements of a more traditional hand-to-hand fighting style.

In close-quarters hand-to-hand combat, a lightsaber that has yet to be turned on would be much more like a firearm than, say, a knife, in that it would be no deadlier than a blunt instrument, but anything that gets in front of its opening could be destroyed. That could lead to an interesting combat style like the "gun kata" demonstrated in the final scene in the film Equilibirum -- the focus was not on disarming your opponent, but in bringing your pistol into an orientation where it would be pointing at some part of the body of your opponent, so you could fire.

Use of the Force largely renders this question moot, as you could use it to simply switch off your opponent's lightsaber, or more permanently mis-align/damage its internal components so it no longer worked. It's also a much more elegant & low-effort attack to tug a crystal a few millimeters off-center than it is to force a large appendage of a strong person in a direction it doesn't want to go. In any event, it's certainly a compelling reason to use a more conventional melee weapon.

3 added emphasis
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It seems like the most interesting combat would be that which treated the lightsaber as a "complete" weapon, taking advantage of its unique propertiestaking advantage of its unique properties, rather than just a glorified sword. Samuel's illustrated answer demonstrates some of these, such as its ability to be quickly switched on and offability to be quickly switched on and off, and its "infinite sharpness""infinite sharpness" (and vulnerability of its wielder to having parts of their body force-pushed/pulled into it).

The lightsaber is not a ranged weaponnot a ranged weapon. This might mean that lightsaber duels would start by the opponents attempting to close on one another as quickly as possibleclose on one another as quickly as possible, so as not to give the other the time to turn on their lightsaber and get into a defensive posture. This could result in elements of a more traditional hand-to-hand fightingtraditional hand-to-hand fighting style.

In close-quarters hand-to-hand combat, a lightsaber that has yet to be turned on would be much more like a firearm than, say, a knife, in that it would be no deadlier than a blunt instrumentno deadlier than a blunt instrument, but anything that gets in front of its opening could be destroyed. That could lead to an interesting combat style like the "gun kata" demonstrated in the final scene in the film Equilibirum -- the focus was not on disarming your opponent, but in bringing your pistol into an orientation where it would be pointing at some part of the body of your opponent, so you could fire.

Use of the Force largely renders this question mootUse of the Force largely renders this question moot, as you could use it to simply switch off your opponent's lightsaber, or more permanently mis-align/damage its internal components so it no longer worked. Certainly a compelling reason to use a more conventional melee weapon.

It seems like the most interesting combat would be that which treated the lightsaber as a "complete" weapon, taking advantage of its unique properties, rather than just a glorified sword. Samuel's illustrated answer demonstrates some of these, such as its ability to be quickly switched on and off, and its "infinite sharpness" (and vulnerability of its wielder to having parts of their body force-pushed/pulled into it).

The lightsaber is not a ranged weapon. This might mean that lightsaber duels would start by the opponents attempting to close on one another as quickly as possible, so as not to give the other the time to turn on their lightsaber and get into a defensive posture. This could result in elements of a more traditional hand-to-hand fighting style.

In close-quarters hand-to-hand combat, a lightsaber that has yet to be turned on would be much more like a firearm than, say, a knife, in that it would be no deadlier than a blunt instrument, but anything that gets in front of its opening could be destroyed. That could lead to an interesting combat style like the "gun kata" demonstrated in the final scene in the film Equilibirum -- the focus was not on disarming your opponent, but in bringing your pistol into an orientation where it would be pointing at some part of the body of your opponent, so you could fire.

Use of the Force largely renders this question moot, as you could use it to simply switch off your opponent's lightsaber, or more permanently mis-align/damage its internal components so it no longer worked. Certainly a compelling reason to use a more conventional melee weapon.

It seems like the most interesting combat would be that which treated the lightsaber as a "complete" weapon, taking advantage of its unique properties, rather than just a glorified sword. Samuel's illustrated answer demonstrates some of these, such as its ability to be quickly switched on and off, and its "infinite sharpness" (and vulnerability of its wielder to having parts of their body force-pushed/pulled into it).

The lightsaber is not a ranged weapon. This might mean that lightsaber duels would start by the opponents attempting to close on one another as quickly as possible, so as not to give the other the time to turn on their lightsaber and get into a defensive posture. This could result in elements of a more traditional hand-to-hand fighting style.

In close-quarters hand-to-hand combat, a lightsaber that has yet to be turned on would be much more like a firearm than, say, a knife, in that it would be no deadlier than a blunt instrument, but anything that gets in front of its opening could be destroyed. That could lead to an interesting combat style like the "gun kata" demonstrated in the final scene in the film Equilibirum -- the focus was not on disarming your opponent, but in bringing your pistol into an orientation where it would be pointing at some part of the body of your opponent, so you could fire.

Use of the Force largely renders this question moot, as you could use it to simply switch off your opponent's lightsaber, or more permanently mis-align/damage its internal components so it no longer worked. Certainly a compelling reason to use a more conventional melee weapon.

2 added point
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