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Stars come in all kinds of sizes. There There are lots of known star systems with more than one sun. The The north star, for example, happens to be a trinary system of one large sun orbited by two smaller ones: 

Polaris star system

I see no good reason why a sun orbited by multiple other suns shouldn't also be orbited by one or more rockrocky planets. Also Also, one of the outer suns could itself have small rock-planets itself, rocky planets, just like planets in our solar system have moons. 

WhenIf you want to build a solar-system system with plausible masses and distances, Ithen I'd recommend you to readreading about the main sequence to learn which masses are plausible for stars and how massstars' masses and age of a starages affect their luminosity. You certainly want all of your suns to have enough apparent magnitude to create notable illumination, but not so much that they grill the planet.

Some numbers to get you started:

  • Jupiter: 317 317.8 earth-massesEarth masses
  • Minimum mass for a star to maintain hydrogen fusion (red dwarf): ~30. ~30,000 earth-massEarth masses
  • Our sun: 332 332,946 earth-massesEarth masses
  • Most massive star known (R136a1): ~88 ~88,000,000 earth-massesEarth masses (but nothere might not be any reason to believe that even larger stars are impossible to existmight not exist…)

Stars come in all kinds of sizes. There are lots of known star systems with more than one sun. The north star, for example, happens to be a trinary system of one large sun orbited by two smaller ones:

Polaris star system

I see no good reason why a sun orbited by multiple other suns shouldn't also be orbited by one or more rock planets. Also, one of the outer suns could have small rock-planets itself, just like planets in our solar system have moons.

When you want to build a solar-system with plausible masses and distances, I recommend you to read about the main sequence to learn which masses are plausible for stars and how mass and age of a star affect their luminosity. You certainly want all your suns to have enough apparent magnitude to create notable illumination, but not so much that they grill the planet.

Some numbers to get you started:

  • Jupiter: 317.8 earth-masses
  • Minimum mass for a star to maintain hydrogen fusion (red dwarf): ~30.000 earth-mass
  • Our sun: 332,946 earth-masses
  • Most massive star known (R136a1): ~88,000,000 earth-masses (but no reason to believe that even larger stars are impossible to exist)

Stars come in all kinds of sizes. There are lots of known star systems with more than one sun. The north star, for example, happens to be a trinary system of one large sun orbited by two smaller ones: 

Polaris star system

I see no good reason why a sun orbited by multiple other suns shouldn't also be orbited by one or more rocky planets. Also, one of the outer suns could itself have small, rocky planets, just like planets in our solar system have moons. 

If you want to build a solar system with plausible masses and distances, then I'd recommend reading about the main sequence to learn which masses are plausible for stars and how stars' masses and ages affect their luminosity. You certainly want all of your suns to have enough apparent magnitude to create notable illumination, but not so much that they grill the planet.

Some numbers to get you started:

  • Jupiter: 317.8 Earth masses
  • Minimum mass for a star to maintain hydrogen fusion (red dwarf): ~30,000 Earth masses
  • Our sun: 332,946 Earth masses
  • Most massive star known (R136a1): ~88,000,000 Earth masses (but there might not be any reason to believe that even larger stars might not exist…)
9 added 68 characters in body
source | link

Stars come in all kinds of sizes. There are lots of known star systems with more than one sun. The north star, for example, happens to be a trinary system of one large sun orbited by two smaller ones:

Polaris star system

I see no good reason why a sun orbited by multiple other suns shouldn't also be orbited by one or more rock planets. Also, one of the outer suns could have small rock-planets itself, just like planets in our solar system have moons.

When you want to build a solar-system with plausible masses and distances, I recommend you to read about the main sequence to learn which masses are plausible for stars and how mass and age of a star affect their luminosity. You certainly want all your suns to have enough apparent magnitude to create notable illumination, but not so much that they grill the planet. 

Some numbers to get you started:

  • Jupiter: 317.8 earth-masses
  • Minimum mass for a star to maintain hydrogen fusion (red dwarf): ~30.000 earth-mass
  • Our sun: 332,946 earth-masses
  • Most massive star known (R136a1): ~88,000,000 earth-masses (but no reason to believe that even larger stars are impossible to exist)

Stars come in all kinds of sizes. There are lots of known star systems with more than one sun. The north star, for example, happens to be a trinary system of one large sun orbited by two smaller ones:

Polaris star system

I see no good reason why a sun orbited by multiple other suns shouldn't also be orbited by one or more rock planets. Also, one of the outer suns could have small rock-planets itself, just like planets in our solar system have moons.

When you want to build a solar-system with plausible masses and distances, I recommend you to read about the main sequence to learn which masses are plausible for stars and how mass and age of a star affect their luminosity. You certainly want all your suns to have enough apparent magnitude to create notable illumination, but not so much that they grill the planet.

Some numbers to get you started:

  • Jupiter: 317.8 earth-masses
  • Minimum mass for a star to maintain hydrogen fusion (red dwarf): ~30.000 earth-mass
  • Our sun: 332,946 earth-masses
  • Most massive star known (R136a1): ~88,000,000 earth-masses (but no reason to believe that even larger stars are impossible to exist)

Stars come in all kinds of sizes. There are lots of known star systems with more than one sun. The north star, for example, happens to be a trinary system of one large sun orbited by two smaller ones:

Polaris star system

I see no good reason why a sun orbited by multiple other suns shouldn't also be orbited by one or more rock planets. Also, one of the outer suns could have small rock-planets itself, just like planets in our solar system have moons.

When you want to build a solar-system with plausible masses and distances, I recommend you to read about the main sequence to learn which masses are plausible for stars and how mass and age of a star affect their luminosity. You certainly want all your suns to have enough apparent magnitude to create notable illumination, but not so much that they grill the planet. 

Some numbers to get you started:

  • Jupiter: 317.8 earth-masses
  • Minimum mass for a star to maintain hydrogen fusion (red dwarf): ~30.000 earth-mass
  • Our sun: 332,946 earth-masses
  • Most massive star known (R136a1): ~88,000,000 earth-masses (but no reason to believe that even larger stars are impossible to exist)
8 added 71 characters in body
source | link

Stars come in all kinds of sizes. There are lots of known star systems with more than one sun. The north star, for example, happens to be a trinary system of one large sun orbited by two smaller ones:

Polaris star system

I see no good reason why a sun orbited by multiple other suns shouldn't also be orbited by one or more rock planets. Also, one of the outer suns could have small rock-planets itself, just like planets in our solar system have moons.

When you want to build a solar-system with plausible masses and distances, I recommend you to read about the main sequence to learn which masses are plausible for stars and how mass and age of a star affect their luminosity. You certainly want all your suns to have enough magnitudeapparent magnitude to create notable illumination, but not so much that they grill the planet.

Some numbers to get you started:

  • Jupiter: 317.8 earth-masses
  • Minimum mass for a star to maintain hydrogen fusion (red dwarf): ~30.000 earth-mass
  • Our sun: 332,946 earth-masses
  • Most massive star known (R136a1): ~88,000,000 earth-masses (but no reason to believe that even larger stars are impossible to exist)

Stars come in all kinds of sizes. There are lots of known star systems with more than one sun. The north star, for example, happens to be a trinary system of one large sun orbited by two smaller ones:

Polaris star system

I see no good reason why a sun orbited by multiple other suns shouldn't also be orbited by one or more rock planets. Also, one of the outer suns could have small rock-planets itself, just like planets in our solar system have moons.

When you want to build a solar-system with plausible masses and distances, I recommend you to read about the main sequence to learn which masses are plausible for stars and how mass and age of a star affect their luminosity. You certainly want all your suns to have enough magnitude to create notable illumination, but not so much that they grill the planet.

Some numbers to get you started:

  • Jupiter: 317.8 earth-masses
  • Minimum mass for a star to maintain hydrogen fusion (red dwarf): ~30.000 earth-mass
  • Our sun: 332,946 earth-masses
  • Most massive star known (R136a1): ~88,000,000 earth-masses (but no reason to believe that even larger stars are impossible to exist)

Stars come in all kinds of sizes. There are lots of known star systems with more than one sun. The north star, for example, happens to be a trinary system of one large sun orbited by two smaller ones:

Polaris star system

I see no good reason why a sun orbited by multiple other suns shouldn't also be orbited by one or more rock planets. Also, one of the outer suns could have small rock-planets itself, just like planets in our solar system have moons.

When you want to build a solar-system with plausible masses and distances, I recommend you to read about the main sequence to learn which masses are plausible for stars and how mass and age of a star affect their luminosity. You certainly want all your suns to have enough apparent magnitude to create notable illumination, but not so much that they grill the planet.

Some numbers to get you started:

  • Jupiter: 317.8 earth-masses
  • Minimum mass for a star to maintain hydrogen fusion (red dwarf): ~30.000 earth-mass
  • Our sun: 332,946 earth-masses
  • Most massive star known (R136a1): ~88,000,000 earth-masses (but no reason to believe that even larger stars are impossible to exist)
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