2 iof -> of
source | link

An example: the Pannonian Sea

The Pannonian Sea was an inland sea which existed for about 10 million years; during the last part of its existence it was isolated from the ocean. It covered most of the territory of modern country of Hungary, and large parts iofof Croatia, Serbia and Romania. I would say that this qualifies as a "very large lake".

The Pannonian Sea during the Miocene Epoch

The Pannonian Sea during the Miocene Epoch, about 6 million years ago. The lake was about 500 km (300 miles) across. Map by user Panonian, available on Wikimedia under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

An example: the Pannonian Sea

The Pannonian Sea was an inland sea which existed for about 10 million years; during the last part of its existence it was isolated from the ocean. It covered most of the territory of modern country of Hungary, and large parts iof Croatia, Serbia and Romania. I would say that this qualifies as a "very large lake".

The Pannonian Sea during the Miocene Epoch

The Pannonian Sea during the Miocene Epoch, about 6 million years ago. The lake was about 500 km (300 miles) across. Map by user Panonian, available on Wikimedia under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

An example: the Pannonian Sea

The Pannonian Sea was an inland sea which existed for about 10 million years; during the last part of its existence it was isolated from the ocean. It covered most of the territory of modern country of Hungary, and large parts of Croatia, Serbia and Romania. I would say that this qualifies as a "very large lake".

The Pannonian Sea during the Miocene Epoch

The Pannonian Sea during the Miocene Epoch, about 6 million years ago. The lake was about 500 km (300 miles) across. Map by user Panonian, available on Wikimedia under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

1
source | link

An example: the Pannonian Sea

The Pannonian Sea was an inland sea which existed for about 10 million years; during the last part of its existence it was isolated from the ocean. It covered most of the territory of modern country of Hungary, and large parts iof Croatia, Serbia and Romania. I would say that this qualifies as a "very large lake".

The Pannonian Sea during the Miocene Epoch

The Pannonian Sea during the Miocene Epoch, about 6 million years ago. The lake was about 500 km (300 miles) across. Map by user Panonian, available on Wikimedia under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.