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An infinite Cylindrical Moon (CM) would do.

This Moon would behave differently from our own.

  • When it is between Cylindrical Earth (CE) and Cylindrical Sun (CS), it is winter, for this is when the least amount of light will reach CE.
  • As CM moves away to unblock sunlight from CE, spring starts. CE gets increasingly more light.
  • At some point, CM starts reflecting light towards CE, which then gets a summer. The summer peaks when CM is full.
  • As CM wanes, autumn/fall begins. This autumn, however, is more like a milder summer.
  • When CM starts coming out of CE's shadow (thus waxing for the second time in its cycle), temperatures rise. This is the second summer in the cycle.
  • When CM stops reflecting light towards CE, a second spring happens. Compared to the first one, this one is in reverse.
  • CM finally starts blocking sunlight again, closing the cycle with another winter.

Notice that CM does not have to be constrained by the same lunation period and apparent size in the sky as our own round Moon. It may have a longer lunation, and a smaller apparent size... This way, it will never cause an eclipse, thus there is no eternal night during the New Moon phase.

An infinite Cylindrical Moon (CM) would do.

This Moon would behave differently from our own.

  • When it is between Cylindrical Earth (CE) and Cylindrical Sun (CS), it is winter, for this is when the least amount of light will reach CE.
  • As CM moves away to unblock sunlight from CE, spring starts. CE gets increasingly more light.
  • At some point, CM starts reflecting light towards CE, which then gets a summer. The summer peaks when CM is full.
  • As CM wanes, autumn/fall begins. This autumn, however, is more like a milder summer.
  • When CM starts coming out of CE's shadow (thus waxing for the second time in its cycle), temperatures rise. This is the second summer in the cycle.
  • When CM stops reflecting light towards CE, a second spring happens. Compared to the first one, this one is in reverse.
  • CM finally starts blocking sunlight again, closing the cycle with another winter.

An infinite Cylindrical Moon (CM) would do.

This Moon would behave differently from our own.

  • When it is between Cylindrical Earth (CE) and Cylindrical Sun (CS), it is winter, for this is when the least amount of light will reach CE.
  • As CM moves away to unblock sunlight from CE, spring starts. CE gets increasingly more light.
  • At some point, CM starts reflecting light towards CE, which then gets a summer. The summer peaks when CM is full.
  • As CM wanes, autumn/fall begins. This autumn, however, is more like a milder summer.
  • When CM starts coming out of CE's shadow (thus waxing for the second time in its cycle), temperatures rise. This is the second summer in the cycle.
  • When CM stops reflecting light towards CE, a second spring happens. Compared to the first one, this one is in reverse.
  • CM finally starts blocking sunlight again, closing the cycle with another winter.

Notice that CM does not have to be constrained by the same lunation period and apparent size in the sky as our own round Moon. It may have a longer lunation, and a smaller apparent size... This way, it will never cause an eclipse, thus there is no eternal night during the New Moon phase.

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source | link

An infinite Cylindrical Moon (CM) would do.

This Moon would behave differently from our own.

  • When it is between Cylindrical Earth (CE) and Cylindrical Sun (CS), it is winter, for this is when the least amount of light will reach CE.
  • As CM moves away to unblock sunlight from CE, spring starts. CE gets increasingly more light.
  • At some point, CM starts reflecting light towards CE, which then gets a summer. The summer peaks when CM is full.
  • As CM wanes, autumn/fall begins. This autumn, however, is more like a milder summer.
  • When CM starts coming out of CE's shadow (thus waxing for the second time in its cycle), temperatures rise. This is the second summer in the cycle.
  • When CM stops reflecting light towards CE, a second spring happens. Compared to the first one, this one is in reverse.
  • CM finally starts blocking sunlight again, closing the cycle with another winter.